Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.
Doby Photography/NPR
Brian Naylor 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Brian Naylor

Correspondent, Washington Desk

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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Story Archive

Former White House staff secretary Rob Porter (left), White House chief of staff John Kelly and White House senior adviser Jared Kushner cross the White House South Lawn in August. Kelly on Friday outlined new security clearance protocols after questions were raised about Porter's access. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Ousted White House staff secretary Rob Porter speaks to President Trump after remarks he made on violence in Charlottesville, Va., in August 2017 at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminister, N.J. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Agency Conducting Government Background Checks Has Backlog Of 700,000

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A chartered train carrying dozens of GOP lawmakers to a Republican retreat in West Virginia struck a garbage truck near Charlottesville, Va., on Wednesday, lawmakers said. This photo provided by Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., shows the crash site on Wednesday. Rep. Greg Walden via AP hide caption

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Rep. Greg Walden via AP

FCC Wants To Ensure Only Those Affected By Natural Disasters Get Emergency Messages

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Why The Federal Workforce Morale Is At An All-Time Low

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On First Weekday Of Shutdown, Federal Workers Had To Sort Out Whether To Go To Work

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During the 2013 shutdown, tourists have to look at Mount Rushmore from the highway because the national memorial in Keystone, S.D., was closed. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Open Or Closed? Here's What Happens In A Partial Government Shutdown

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