Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.
Doby Photography/NPR
Brian Naylor 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Brian Naylor

Correspondent, Washington Desk

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Then-candidate Donald Trump walks onstage at a presidential debate in St. Louis two days after a video was released, in which he is heard talking to Access Hollywood host Billy Bush about sexually assaulting women. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

President Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., leave a meeting with House Republicans on Thursday, shortly before the House approved a GOP tax overhaul plan. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., appears in 2009 with then-Sen. Jeff Sessions of Alabama. McConnell suggested on Tuesday that Sessions run as a write-in candidate to keep former judge Roy Moore from winning his old seat. Ron Edmonds/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ron Edmonds/AP

Roy Moore, the Alabama Republican candidate for U.S. Senate, has been accused of previous sexual misconduct with teenagers, which he has denied. Wes Frazer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Wes Frazer/Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Says His Investment In A Shipping Firm Tied To Russia Isn't Problematic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/562393813/562393814" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After NYC Attack, Trump Takes Aim At Visa Program That Allowed Suspect Into U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/561427890/561427891" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York is being blamed by President Trump for promoting a visa program that was used by the alleged driver of the truck in the New York terrorist attack. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Lee Harvey Oswald is shown on Nov. 22, 1963, after being arrested for the murder of President John F. Kennedy. Stringer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stringer/AFP/Getty Images

Most Of The New JFK Files Have Been Seen Before In Some Form

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/560328903/560484123" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The National Archives has released a batch of government files on the Nov. 22, 1963, assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas. Jim Altgens/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Altgens/AP

2,800 JFK Assassination Files Have Been Released, Others Withheld

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/559799857/560276823" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This image provided by Emory University shows letters sent by then future President Barack Obama to his college girlfriend Alexandra McNear. The university is making the letters available to researchers Thursday. Ann Borden/Emory University/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ann Borden/Emory University/AP

In his opening statement before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Attorney General Jeff Sessions rebuffed the panel's Democrats on the issue of executive privilege. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images