Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.
Brian Naylor in 2018.
Stories By

Brian Naylor

Allison Shelley/NPR
Brian Naylor in 2018.
Allison Shelley/NPR

Brian Naylor

Correspondent, Washington Desk

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk. In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent, and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress, and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Journalism Award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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Story Archive

Attorney General William Barr speaks about the redacted version of the Mueller report as U.S. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein (right) and U.S. Acting Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General Ed O'Callaghan listen at the Department of Justice Thursday before the document's release. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen shakes hands with President Trump in El Centro, Calif., on April 5 after he arrived to visit the border wall between the United States and Mexico. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Director of the U.S. Secret Service Randolph Alles speaks at the Justice Department last year. The White House announced on Monday that Alles will be replaced. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen is leaving her post, President Trump announced Sunday. Here she testifies on Capitol Hill on March 6. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Former Vice President Joe Biden is joined by some children onstage, as he speaks at an International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers conference Friday in Washington. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max aircraft are parked at a Southern California airport after the aircraft was grounded by the FAA. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Not Just Airplanes: Why The Government Often Lets Industry Regulate Itself

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Boeing's Not Alone In Companies That Government Agencies Have Let Self-Regulate

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., walks to a Democratic Caucus meeting at the Capitol on Tuesday. She told lawmakers to "stay focused on our purpose for the people" with the end of the special counsel's Russia investigation. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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After Mueller Report Memo, Democrats Turn To Health Care — For Now

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Attorney General William Barr, seen leaving his home on March 21, will determine how much of the Mueller report to release to Congress and the public. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Attorney General William Barr is being urged by both Democrats and Republicans to make special counsel Robert Mueller's final report public. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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