Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.
Brian Naylor in 2018.
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Brian Naylor

Allison Shelley/NPR
Brian Naylor in 2018.
Allison Shelley/NPR

Brian Naylor

Correspondent, Washington Desk

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk. In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent, and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress, and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Journalism Award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo. (left); Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif.; and Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts arrive to the Senate chamber for impeachment proceedings on Thursday. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Speaker Nancy Pelosi told Democrats the House will vote to send the articles of impeachment against President Trump to the Senate Wednesday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

House To Vote Wednesday To Send Impeachment Articles To Senate

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A Look At The Moments And Events That Led Congress To Trump's Impeachment

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., holds hands with Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., as they walk to the chamber where the House begins debate on the impeachment charges against President Trump. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler had adjourned Thursday without a vote on the articles of impeachment. Ranking member Doug Collins (in background) likened the move to a "kangaroo court." J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Department of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz arrives for a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the Inspector General's report on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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President Clinton in the Rose Garden of the White House on Dec. 11, 1998, before delivering a statement on the impeachment inquiry. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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