Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.
Brian Naylor in 2018.
Stories By

Brian Naylor

Allison Shelley/NPR
Brian Naylor in 2018.
Allison Shelley/NPR

Brian Naylor

Correspondent, Washington Desk

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk. In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent, and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress, and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Journalism Award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Department of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz arrives for a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the Inspector General's report on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

President Clinton in the Rose Garden of the White House on Dec. 11, 1998, before delivering a statement on the impeachment inquiry. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., announced at the Capitol on Thursday that the House is drafting articles of impeachment against President Trump. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A Look At The Parallels Between The Clinton And Trump Impeachment Processes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/784883518/784883519" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former White House national security aide Fiona Hill and David Holmes, a U.S. diplomat in Ukraine, return from a break to continue their testimony before the House Intelligence Committee on Thursday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

"Was there a 'quid pro quo'?" Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland said in his opening remarks to House Intelligence Committee."With regard to the requested White House call and White House meeting, the answer is yes." Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Impeachment Hearings Illustrate Longstanding Conflict Throughout Trump's Presidency

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/780563096/780563097" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Daniel Goldman, attorney and director of investigations with the House Intelligence Committee (second from left); committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif; ranking member Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif.; and Steve Castor, counsel for the minority, hold the first public hearing of the impeachment inquiry on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump and first lady Melania Trump meet with Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his wife, Emine Erdogan, outside the White House on Wednesday. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Trump, Erdogan Have 'Frank' Discussion About Syria

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/778602142/778690917" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In an interview with NPR about her new book, former Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley said she made an effort to avoid "toxic" and "trashy" Washington — and that she'll campaign for President Trump in 2020. Above, she poses for a portrait at NPR studios in New York City on Nov. 8. Amr Alfiky for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Amr Alfiky for NPR

Former U.N. Ambassador Haley: Trump Actions 'Not A Good Practice' But Not Impeachable

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/777679782/778343817" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., has announced the first open hearings of the impeachment inquiry — set to begin next week. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump and Republican allies have decried the impeachment inquiry process, but Democrats say they are following precedent. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

FACT CHECK: Is The Trump Impeachment Process Different From Nixon And Clinton?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/775152421/775588833" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Department of Homeland official Chad Wolf speaks during a meeting earlier this month in Washington, D.C. President Trump is set to pick wolf to lead DHS in an acting capacity. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Brandon/AP