Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.
Brian Naylor in 2018.
Stories By

Brian Naylor

Allison Shelley/NPR
Brian Naylor in 2018.
Allison Shelley/NPR

Brian Naylor

Correspondent, Washington Desk

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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Story Archive

Speaker Nancy Pelosi has written President Trump to suggest his annual State of the Union message to Congress be delayed until the partial government shutdown ends. Wayne Partlow/AP hide caption

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Wayne Partlow/AP

The White House says tax refund checks will go out despite the partial government shutdown. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Despite 70,000 Furloughed IRS Workers, White House Vows Refunds Will Be Issued

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Government Shutdown Is Causing A Lot Of Uncertainty As Tax Filing Season Approaches

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President Trump, with (from left) Vice President Pence, House Minority Whip Steve Scalise and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, addresses reporters in the Rose Garden of the White House about the government shutdown on Friday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (from left), Senate Minority Whip Richard Durbin, House Speaker-designate Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer talk to journalists following a meeting with President Trump at the White House on Wednesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

If Funding Compromise Is Not Reached 400,000 Federal Employees Will Work Without Pay

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The U.S. Capitol is seen Friday as the Senate worked on a House-passed bill that would pay for President Trump's border wall. After a procedural vote in the Senate, both chambers of Congress adjourned until midday Saturday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

President Trump arrives to speak at a signing ceremony for HR 2, the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018, at the Executive Office Building on Thursday. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

The U.S. Government Is Careening Perilously Close To A Shutdown

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Donald Trump awards a $100,000 check to a veterans charity in Sioux City, Iowa, during a 2016 event. His use of the Trump Foundation during the campaign raised legal questions about its activities. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images