Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.
Allison Shelley/NPR
Brian Naylor in 2018.
Allison Shelley/NPR

Brian Naylor

Correspondent, Washington Desk

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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Rapper Kanye West shows a picture of a plane on a phone to President Trump during a meeting in the Oval Office on Thursday. Getty Images hide caption

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'Quite Something': Kanye West Makes A Statement In The Oval Office

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Retired Justice Anthony Kennedy administers the Judicial Oath to Judge Brett Kavanaugh in the Justices' Conference Room of the Supreme Court Building. Ashley Kavanaugh holds the Bible. At left are their daughters, Margaret, background, and Liza. Fred Schilling/Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States via AP hide caption

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Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., walks to the Senate floor for a cloture vote on the nomination of Supreme Court Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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People with cellphones will receive a message like this one on Wednesday. FEMA hide caption

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This Is Only A Test: Why Your Cellphone Buzzed Wednesday Afternoon

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President Trump discusses a revised U.S. trade agreement with Mexico and Canada during a news conference Monday in the Rose Garden of the White House. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Says New Trade Agreement To Replace NAFTA Is A Campaign Promise Kept

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Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Brett Kavanaugh Offers Fiery Defense In Hearing That Was A National Cultural Moment

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The Senate Judiciary Committee hearing room is prepared for Thursday's planned testimony from Christine Blasey Ford and Judge Brett Kavanaugh. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 6, the third day of his Supreme Court confirmation hearing. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, has requested a response from Christine Blasey Ford about whether she will testify before the committee. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Members of the FEMA Urban Search and Rescue Task Force 4 search a flooded neighborhood for people who may have been trapped by the rising floodwaters during now-tropical storm Florence in North Carolina. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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