Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.
Allison Shelley/NPR
Brian Naylor in 2018.
Allison Shelley/NPR

Brian Naylor

Correspondent, Washington Desk

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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Story Archive

Michael Horowitz, the Department of Justice inspector general, swears in to a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing last year. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Government's Busy Watchdogs: What They Do And Where They Struggle

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A U.S. Border Patrol vehicle is seen from Mexico while patrolling the border between the cities of El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua state, on April 7. Herika Martinez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fact Check: Is The Post Office Losing Money By Delivering Packages For Amazon?

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Former Vice President Joe Biden got into a verbal tussle with President Trump over who would win a fight, just before announcing a three-part "Plan To Put Work-and Workers-First." Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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U.S. Security Officials Uncertain Of How To Address Infrastructure Vulnerabilities

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Passengers use facial recognition scanners before boarding a British Airways flight in Orlando, Fla. Brian Naylor/NPR hide caption

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Facial Scanning Now Arriving At U.S. Airports

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Critics Concerned About Privacy Issues As Biometric Scanning Increases

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From left: Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, Labor Secretary Alex Acosta, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue and Energy Secretary Rick Perry appear before a Senate committee Wednesday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Head Of Background Investigation Bureau Testifies Before Senate Intelligence Committee

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Forecasters at the National Weather Service office monitor Hurricane Irma on Sept. 9, 2017, at the hurricane center in Miami. Andy Newman/AP hide caption

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National Weather Service Forecast: Cloudy, With A Chance Of Budget Cuts

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Forecast For National Weather Service Is Cloudy, With A Chance Of Budget Cuts

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