Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.
Brian Naylor in 2018.
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Brian Naylor

Allison Shelley/NPR
Brian Naylor in 2018.
Allison Shelley/NPR

Brian Naylor

Correspondent, Washington Desk

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk. In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent, and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress, and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Journalism Award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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Because of the coronavirus, mail volume is down, and the U.S. Postal Service says it may run out of money by this summer. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

You've Got Less Mail: The Postal Service Is Suffering Amid The Coronavirus

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Experts Say A National Quarantine Is Probably Not Legal

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Cars cross 42th Street as rain falls on New York City. President Trump considered, and then dropped, a proposed quarantine of New York state, New Jersey and parts of Connecticut. Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

Federal Emergency Management Agency Launches Website To Combat False Rumors

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A pedestrian carries two packages of toilet paper as she walks along Market Street in San Francisco earlier this month. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Federal Employees Demand More Telework Capacity, As Personnel Management Head Quits

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A White House nurse prepares to administer the H1N1 vaccine to President Barack Obama at the White House on Dec. 20, 2009. On Friday, President Trump called the Obama administration's response to that outbreak "a full scale disaster." The White House via Getty Images hide caption

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The White House via Getty Images

The White House is taking a different view on telework as the Office of Personnel Management, housed in the Theodore Roosevelt Federal Building, tells agencies to incorporate the practice into contingency plans. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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