Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.
Brian Naylor in 2018.
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Brian Naylor

Allison Shelley/NPR
Brian Naylor in 2018.
Allison Shelley/NPR

Brian Naylor

Correspondent, Washington Desk

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk. In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent, and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress, and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Journalism Award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

Story Archive

Containers are stacked high at the Port of Los Angeles on Sept. 28. A record number of cargo ships are stuck floating and waiting off the Southern California coast amid a supply chain crisis that the Biden administration is hoping to ease. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

There's a backlog at U.S. ports. Here's how Biden hopes to get you your goods, faster

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Former President Donald Trump's company lost more than $70 million operating his Washington, D.C., hotel while he was in office, according to documents released by congressional Democrats on Friday. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

The Postal Service says the predicted slowdown is caused in part by the agency's decision to rely less on moving mail by air and more by ground transportation. Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

The Postal Service is slowing the mail to save money. Critics say it's a death spiral

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Jessica Rosenworcel of the Federal Communications Commission testifies at a Senate hearing in September 2016. Her term as acting FCC chairwoman is set to expire when Congress adjourns at the end of the year. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images

Biden Hasn't Named Picks For Posts To The FCC, And That's Frustrating Democrats

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U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas listens during a ceremony on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 26, 2020. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Gymnasts (from left) Aly Raisman, Simone Biles, McKayla Maroney and Maggie Nichols leave after testifying Wednesday at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the FBI's handling of the Larry Nassar investigation. Nassar was charged in 2016 with federal child pornography offenses and sexual abuse charges in Michigan and is now serving decades in prison. Saul Loeb/Pool via AP hide caption

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Saul Loeb/Pool via AP

Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett speaks Sunday at the University of Louisville's McConnell Center in Kentucky. She told an audience that "judicial philosophies are not the same as political parties." Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/AP

In the years after the 9/11 terror attacks, security became omnipresent in Washington, D.C. That includes bollards, Jersey barriers and security barricades like those seen here outside of the U.S. Capitol. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

After 9/11 Security Became Omnipresent In Washington, But Threats Are Different Now

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President Biden tours Brookland Middle School in Washington, D.C., on Friday. Biden has encouraged school districts to promote vaccines to protect students as they return to school amid a coronavirus resurgence. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP