Brian Naylor NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.
Brian Naylor in 2018.
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Brian Naylor

Allison Shelley/NPR
Brian Naylor in 2018.
Allison Shelley/NPR

Brian Naylor

Correspondent, Washington Desk

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk. In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent, and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress, and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Journalism Award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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Story Archive

Federal Law Enforcement Agencies To Protect Statues And Monuments This July 4th

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Supreme Court: Montana Can't Exclude Religious Schools From Scholarship Program

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Mark Sherman/AP

Supreme Court Hands Abortion-Rights Advocates A Victory In Louisiana Case

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Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., right, addresses a news conference Wednesday to announce a Republican police reform bill on Capitol Hill. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

An economic relief check distributed by the IRS to help with hardships caused by the coronavirus pandemic. It may take some time for the IRS to get through its backlog of work. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

With Tax Deadline Looming, IRS Faces Backlog As It Transitions Out Of COVID-19 Crisis

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IRS Workers Return To Office Work, Face A Whole Host Of Challenges

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Philonise Floyd (left), brother of George Floyd, fist-bumps Ben Crump, civil rights attorney representing the Floyd family, after speaking during a hearing on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. Brendan Smialowski/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Attorney General William Barr, pictured last week in the Oval Office, denied that President Trump's controversial visit this week to St. John's Church in Washington, D.C., was a political move. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Former President Barack Obama, here at a Chicago event in October, has weighed in on the aftermath of George Floyd's killing, saying those who've resorted to violence put "innocent people at risk." Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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The U.S. Postal Service faces challenges as more voters turn to mail in ballots during the coronavirus pandemic. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

As More Americans Prepare To Vote By Mail, Postal Service Faces Big Challenges

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With months to go until the 2020 election, the presidential transition process is already underway. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Behind The Scenes, Presidential Transition Planning Is Underway

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