Lynn Neary Lynn Neary is an NPR arts correspondent covering books and publishing.
Lynn Neary at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 21, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Lynn Neary

Anne Tyler's Baltimore Chris Hartlove for NPR hide caption

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Chris Hartlove for NPR

The Art Of The Everyday: The Alchemy Of Anne Tyler

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Hyperion Books
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Spurred By Success, Publishers Look For The Next 'Hunger Games'

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The Cat In The Hat makes an appearance at a party during the Tools of Change 2012 conference in New York last week. Pinar Ozger/O'Reilly Conferences/Flickr hide caption

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Pinar Ozger/O'Reilly Conferences/Flickr
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Tourtiere is "one of Canada's better contributions to the culinary world," says Thomas Naylor, executive chef to the Canadian ambassador to the U.S. Larry Crowe/AP hide caption

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Larry Crowe/AP

Basil Rathbone (right), as Sherlock Holmes, and Nigel Bruce, as Dr. Watson, in The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, 1945. AP hide caption

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AP

The Enduring Popularity Of Sherlock Holmes

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Conversation Starters: 2011's Top 5 Book Club Picks

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2011 National Book Award Winners Announced

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Shirley Mason was the psychiatric patient whose life was portrayed in the 1973 book Sybil. The book and subsequent film caused an enormous spike in reported cases of multiple personality disorder. Mason later admitted she had faked her multiple personalities.

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Courtesy Simon & Schuster