Lynn Neary Lynn Neary is an NPR arts correspondent and a frequent guest host often heard on Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.
Doby Photography/NPR
Lynn Neary
Doby Photography/NPR

Lynn Neary

Correspondent, Arts Desk and Guest Host

Lynn Neary is an NPR arts correspondent and a frequent guest host often heard on Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

In her role on the Arts desk, Neary reports on an industry in transition as publishing moves into the digital age. As she covers books and publishing, she relishes the opportunity to interview many of her favorite authors from Barbara Kingsolver to Ian McEwan.

Arriving at NPR in 1982, Neary spent two years working as a newscaster during Morning Edition. Then, for the next eight years, Neary was the host of Weekend All Things Considered. In 1992, she joined the cultural desk to develop NPR's first religion beat. As religion correspondent, Neary covered the country's diverse religious landscape and the politics of the religious right.

Over the years Neary has won numerous prestigious awards including the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism award, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting Gold Award, an Ohio State Award, an Association of Women in Radio and Television Award and the Gabriel award. For her reporting on the role of religion in the debate over welfare reform, Neary shared in NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton Award.

A Fordham University graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in English, Neary thinks she has the ideal job and suspects she is the envy of English majors everywhere.

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Jennifer Hudson performs during the the March for Our Lives rally in Washington, D.C. on March 24, 2018. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

'The Times They Are A-Changin" Still Speaks To Our Changing Times

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Jonah (Evan Rosado) is the youngest of three children who roam under the auspices of their father (Raul Castillo) in the film adaptation of We the Animals. Courtesy of The Orchard hide caption

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Courtesy of The Orchard

'We The Animals' Becomes A Film, And The Author Approves

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V.S. Naipaul, seen here in 1968, once told NPR, "It's important to avoid the wallow. It repels the reader." John Minihan/Evening Standard/Getty Images hide caption

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John Minihan/Evening Standard/Getty Images

V.S. Naipaul, Controversial Author And Nobel Laureate, Dies At 85

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Amy Adams plays Camille Preaker in the HBO adaptation of Gillian Flynn's mystery novel Sharp Objects. Anne Marie Fox/HBO hide caption

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Anne Marie Fox/HBO

Gillian Flynn's 'Sharp Objects' Is A Whodunit ... And A Who Is She?

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HUD And National Book Foundation Work To Promote Reading In Public Housing

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Tommy Orange's debut novel features a wide cast of characters who are all Native American, with varying degrees of connection to the culture. He says, "I wanted to represent a range of human experience as a way to humanize Native people." Joana Toro for NPR hide caption

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Joana Toro for NPR

Native American Author Tommy Orange Feels A 'Burden To Set The Record Straight'

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Tommy Orange's 'There There' Has A Wide Cast Of Native American Characters

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A Book Club Watches The Movie 'Book Club'

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How Philip Roth's Writing Transcended The Narrow Confines Of A Culture

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Tom Wolfe, Author Of 'Bonfire Of The Vanities,' Dies At 88

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In Zora Neale Hurston's 'Barracoon,' Language Is The Key To Understanding

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Zora Neale Hurston's 'Barracoon' Gets Published, More Than 60 Years Later

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Music is integral to Arena Stage's Snow Child, and actors sometimes join the house band on their own instruments. Maria Baranova-Suzuki hide caption

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Maria Baranova-Suzuki

'Snow Child' Conveys Alaska's Wild Magic In Musical Form

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