Patti Neighmond Award-winning journalist Patti Neighmond is NPR's health policy correspondent. Her reports air regularly on NPR newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition.
Patricia Neighmond
Murray Bognowitz/N/A

Patti Neighmond

Correspondent, Health Policy, Science Desk

Award-winning journalist Patti Neighmond is NPR's health policy correspondent. Her reports air regularly on NPR newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

Based in Los Angeles, Neighmond has covered health care policy since April 1987. She joined NPR's staff in 1981, covering local New York City news as well as the United Nations. In 1984, she became a producer for NPR's science unit and specialized in science and environmental issues.

Neighmond has earned a broad array of awards for her reporting. In 1993, she received the prestigious George Foster Peabody Award for coverage of health reform. That same year she received the Robert F. Kennedy Award for a story on a young quadriplegic who convinced Georgia officials that she could live at home less expensively and more happily than in a nursing home. In 1990 she won the World Hunger Award for a story about healthcare and low-income children. Neighmond received two awards in 1989: a George Polk Award for her powerful ten-part series on AIDS patient Archie Harrison, who was taking the anti-viral drug AZT; and a Major Armstrong Award for her series on the Canadian health care system. The Population Institute, based in Washington, DC, has presented its radio documentary award to Neighmond twice: in 1988 for "Family Planning in India" and in 1984 for her coverage of overpopulation in Mexico. Her 1987 report "AIDS and Doctors" won the National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism, and her two-part series on the aquaculture industry earned the 1986 American Association for the Advancement of Science Award.

Neighmond began her career in journalism in 1978, at the Pacifica Foundation's Washington D.C. bureau, where she covered Capitol Hill and the White House. She began freelance reporting for NPR from New York City in 1980. Neighmond earned her bachelor's degree in English and drama from the University of Maryland, and now lives in Los Angeles with her husband and two children.

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A serving of salmon contains about 600 IUs of vitamin D, researchers say, and a cup of fortified milk around 100. Cereals and juices are sometimes fortified, too. Check the labels, researchers say, and aim for 600 IUs daily, or 800 if you're older than 70. Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley hide caption

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Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley

Does Vitamin D Really Protect Against Colorectal Cancer?

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Immunofluorescent light micrograph of human colon cancer cells, highlighting the nucleus of each cell in pink. U.S. doctors have been seeing an increase in colorectal cancer cases — and deaths — among people under age 50. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Get Screened Earlier For Colorectal Cancer, Urges American Cancer Society

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Patients in the study had "significantly lower out-of-pocket costs — on the average, $500 — when they visited a physical therapist first," says Bianca Frogner, a health economist at the University of Washington. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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Trying Physical Therapy First For Low Back Pain May Curb Use Of Opioids

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Cutting back up to 25 percent of your calories per day helps slow your metabolism and reduce free radicals that cause cell damage and aging. But would you want to? VisualField/Getty Images hide caption

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You May Live Longer By Severely Restricting Calories, Scientists Say

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Hearts Get 'Younger,' Even At Middle Age, With Exercise

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Virginia Harrod, an attorney and county prosecutor who lives in rural Kentucky, survived breast cancer, only to develop lymphedema, which sent her to the hospital three times with serious infections. A lymph node transplant helped restore her immune system. Luke Sharrett for NPR hide caption

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Luke Sharrett for NPR

She Survived Breast Cancer, But Says A Treatment Side Effect 'Almost Killed' Her

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A review of the evidence suggests that alerting people — by text, phone call or other method — when they're due or overdue to get a particular vaccination can boost immunization rates. Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images

Got Your Flu Shot Yet? Consider This A Reminder

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Vapor from e-cigarettes contains toxins, although fewer than conventional cigarettes. mauro_grigollo/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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E-Cigarettes Likely Encourage Kids To Try Tobacco But May Help Adults Quit

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Dr. Mathilde Krim at the World AIDS Day Symposium presented by the Foundation For AIDS Research and the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in 2002. Krim had a knack for helping people talk about HIV/AIDS rationally, colleagues say. Theo Wargo/WireImage hide caption

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Pioneering HIV Researcher Mathilde Krim Remembered For Her Activism

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In both urban and rural areas, about 40 percent of women surveyed were currently married to a member of the opposite sex. Only about 30 percent of the rural women of childbearing age had no children, versus roughly 41 percent of urban women. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Equinox's rope class involves exercising with a jump rope. Courtesy of Equinox hide caption

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Courtesy of Equinox

Top Fitness Trends For 2018: Back To Basics

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Young bodies may more easily rebound from long bouts of sitting, with just an hour at the gym. But research suggests physical recovery from binge TV-watching gets harder in our 50s and as we get older. Lily Padula for NPR hide caption

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Lily Padula for NPR

Home For The Holidays? Get Off The Couch!

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Even Low-Dose Contraceptives Slightly Increase Breast Cancer Risk

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Light Therapy Might Help People With Bipolar Depression

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Doctors think the chronic pain of "shoulder impingement" may arise from age-related tendon and muscle degeneration, or from a bone spur that can rub against a tendon. Michele Constantini/PhotoAlto/Getty Images hide caption

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Michele Constantini/PhotoAlto/Getty Images

Popular Surgery To Ease Chronic Shoulder Pain Called Into Question

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