Patti Neighmond Award-winning journalist Patti Neighmond is NPR's health policy correspondent. Her reports air regularly on NPR newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition.
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Study Shows Extra Testosterone Might Help Some Older Men

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When Men Get Breast Cancer, They Enter A World Of Pink

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Depression Screening Recommended For Pregnant Women, New Mothers

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Katherine Du/NPR

Can't Focus? It Might Be Undiagnosed Adult ADHD

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Forgot Something Again? It's Probably Just Normal Aging

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Fear of cancer's return may be driving women with an early diagnosis of breast cancer to have one or both breasts removed, though research shows milder treatment is just as effective. Jose Luis Pelaez/Getty Images hide caption

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Jose Luis Pelaez/Getty Images

Mastectomy No Better Than Lumpectomy For Early Breast Cancer

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In a study of 1.3 million women, ages 40 to 74, having a false positive on a screening mammogram was associated with a slightly increased chance that the woman would eventually develop breast cancer. The extra risk seemed to be independent of the density of her breasts. Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images hide caption

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Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images

False Alarm Mammograms May Still Signal Higher Breast Cancer Risk

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Gratitude Is Good For The Soul And Helps The Heart, Too

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Birth control pills are 99 percent effective in preventing pregnancy, research shows — but only if you remember to take them as prescribed. Rod-shaped implants, T-shaped IUDs and vaginal rings are other options. BSIP/Science Source hide caption

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BSIP/Science Source
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Hormones May Help Younger Women With Menopause Symptoms

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Physical exercise, diet and supportive counseling are the first steps of any weight-loss program. But sometimes that's not enough to take large amounts of weight off, and keep it off, doctors say. 13/Ocean/Corbis hide caption

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13/Ocean/Corbis

Surgery Helps Some Obese Teens In Battle To Get Fit

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A woman's health history and tolerance for different kinds of risks should have a legitimate role in determining the timing of when she starts and stops getting screening mammograms, some leading doctors say. Sally Elford/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Sally Elford/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Why Is Mammogram Advice Still Such A Tangle? Ask Your Doctor

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Forget Last Year's Hiccups, Go Get Your Flu Shot

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A Metronome Can Help Set The CPR Beat

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