Patti Neighmond Award-winning journalist Patti Neighmond is NPR's health policy correspondent. Her reports air regularly on NPR newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition.
Patricia Neighmond
Murray Bognowitz/N/A

Patti Neighmond

Correspondent, Health Policy, Science Desk

Award-winning journalist Patti Neighmond is NPR's health policy correspondent. Her reports air regularly on NPR newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

Based in Los Angeles, Neighmond has covered health care policy since April 1987. She joined NPR's staff in 1981, covering local New York City news as well as the United Nations. In 1984, she became a producer for NPR's science unit and specialized in science and environmental issues.

Neighmond has earned a broad array of awards for her reporting. In 1993, she received the prestigious George Foster Peabody Award for coverage of health reform. That same year she received the Robert F. Kennedy Award for a story on a young quadriplegic who convinced Georgia officials that she could live at home less expensively and more happily than in a nursing home. In 1990 she won the World Hunger Award for a story about healthcare and low-income children. Neighmond received two awards in 1989: a George Polk Award for her powerful ten-part series on AIDS patient Archie Harrison, who was taking the anti-viral drug AZT; and a Major Armstrong Award for her series on the Canadian health care system. The Population Institute, based in Washington, DC, has presented its radio documentary award to Neighmond twice: in 1988 for "Family Planning in India" and in 1984 for her coverage of overpopulation in Mexico. Her 1987 report "AIDS and Doctors" won the National Press Club Award for Consumer Journalism, and her two-part series on the aquaculture industry earned the 1986 American Association for the Advancement of Science Award.

Neighmond began her career in journalism in 1978, at the Pacifica Foundation's Washington D.C. bureau, where she covered Capitol Hill and the White House. She began freelance reporting for NPR from New York City in 1980. Neighmond earned her bachelor's degree in English and drama from the University of Maryland, and now lives in Los Angeles with her husband and two children.

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Doctors think the chronic pain of "shoulder impingement" may arise from age-related tendon and muscle degeneration, or from a bone spur that can rub against a tendon. Michele Constantini/PhotoAlto/Getty Images hide caption

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Popular Surgery To Ease Chronic Shoulder Pain Called Into Question

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The study drew on survey data from half a million U.S. teenagers from 2010 to 2015. martin-dm/Getty Images hide caption

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Increased Hours Online Correlate With An Uptick In Teen Depression, Suicidal Thoughts

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A recent test by dermatologists found that 83 percent of the top-selling moisturizers that are labeled "hypoallergenic"contained a potentially allergenic chemical. Jill Ferry/Getty Images hide caption

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'Hypoallergenic' And 'Fragrance-Free' Moisturizer Claims Are Often False

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Brian Keith Thompson, owner of the Body Electric tattoo and piercing studio in Hollywood, says he is relentless in enforcing hygiene standards. Courtesy of Body Electric Tattoo hide caption

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Courtesy of Body Electric Tattoo

Teen Wants A Tattoo? Pediatricians Say Here's How To Do It Safely

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Young bodies may more easily rebound from long bouts of sitting, with just an hour at the gym. But research suggests physical recovery from binge TV-watching gets harder in our 50s and as we get older. Lily Padula for NPR hide caption

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Lily Padula for NPR

Get Off The Couch Baby Boomers, Or You May Not Be Able To Later

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Surface stains from things like coffee, tea, tobacco and red wine can be lightened with routine brushing, flossing and professional cleaning in the dental office. But deeper stains that come with age and damage to the tooth require bleaching agents or veneers. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Navigating The 'Aisle Of Confusion' To Whiten Your Teeth

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Girls are much less likely to be diagnosed with autism, but that may be because the signs of the disorder can be less obvious than in boys. And girls may be missing out on help as a result. Sara Wong for NPR hide caption

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Sara Wong for NPR

'Social Camouflage' May Lead To Underdiagnosis Of Autism In Girls

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Mammography has helped increase the early detection of breast tumors. Now, researchers say, the goal is to discern which of those tumors need aggressive treatment, including chemotherapy or radiation after surgery. Chicago Tribune/Getty Images hide caption

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Tumor Test Helps Identify Which Breast Cancers Don't Require Extra Treatment

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A change in guidelines for breast cancer surgery has resulted in fewer women having to undergo repeat surgeries. Martin J Cook/Getty Images hide caption

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Fewer Women Need To Undergo Repeat Surgery After Lumpectomy

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Researchers had participants wear the fitness trackers while walking or running on a treadmill and while riding an exercise bike to determine how well the trackers measured heart rate and energy expenditure. Paul Sakuma/Courtesy of Stanford University School of Medicine hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/Courtesy of Stanford University School of Medicine

Fitness Trackers: Good at Measuring Heart Rate, Not So Good At Measuring Calories

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Hannah Vanderkooy demonstrates the napping pod she uses at Las Cruces High School in Las Cruces, N.M. Joe Suarez for NPR hide caption

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Stressed-Out High Schoolers Advised To Try A Nap Pod

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Yo-Yo Dieting May Pose Serious Risks For Heart Patients

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