Jackie Northam Jackie Northam is NPR's International Affairs Correspondent. She is a veteran journalist who has spent three decades reporting on conflict, politics, and life across the globe.
Jackie Northam 2018 square
Stories By

Jackie Northam

Stephen Voss/NPR
Jackie Northam 2018
Stephen Voss/NPR

Jackie Northam

International Affairs Correspondent

Jackie Northam is NPR's International Affairs Correspondent. She is a veteran journalist who has spent three decades reporting on conflict, geopolitics and life across the globe — from the mountains of Afghanistan and the desert sands of Saudi Arabia, to the gritty prison camp at Guantanamo Bay and the pristine beauty of the Arctic.

Northam spent more than a dozen years as an international correspondent living in London, Budapest, Bangkok, Phnom Penh and Nairobi. She charted the fall of communism in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union, reported from Iraq after the fall of Saddam Hussein and covered the rise of Saudi Arabia's powerful Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. She was in Islamabad in 2021 to cover the fall of Afghanistan to the Taliban and the chaotic U.S. withdrawal.

Her work has taken her to conflict zones around the world. Northam covered the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, arriving in the country just four days after Hutu extremists began slaughtering ethnic Tutsis. In Afghanistan, she accompanied Green Berets on a precarious mission to take a Taliban base. In Cambodia, she reported from Khmer Rouge strongholds.

Throughout her career, Northam has revealed the human experience behind the headlines, such as the courage of Afghan villagers defying militant death threats to cast their vote in a national election, or exhausted rescue workers desperately searching for survivors following a massive earthquake in Haiti.

Northam joined NPR in 2000 as National Security Correspondent, covering defense and intelligence policies at the height of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. She led the network's coverage of the Abu Ghraib abuse scandal and the military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Her present beat focuses on the complex relationship between geopolitics and the global economy, including U.S. efforts to sanction Russia and counter China's rising power.

Northam has received multiple journalism awards, including Edward R. Murrow and Associated Press awards, and was part of the NPR team that won an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award for "The DNA Files," a series about the science of genetics.

Originally from Canada, Northam spends her time off crewing in the summer, on the ski hills in the winter and on long walks year-round with her beloved beagle, Tara.

Story Archive

Wednesday

U.S. wants China to use its influence with Iran to calm tensions in the Middle East

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1245238087/1245238088" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

Trudeau says China tried unsuccessfully to meddle in Canada's elections

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1244042245/1244042246" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

Moscow's hostage game with Evan Gershkovich and the U.S. diplomats trying to free him

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1241726817/1241726818" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

The Dali container vessel after striking the Francis Scott Key Bridge that collapsed into the Patapsco River in Baltimore, on Tuesday. The Port of Baltimore, which has the highest volume of auto imports in the U.S., is now temporarily closed. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Baltimore's Key Bridge collapse is expected to disrupt supply chains

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1241134460/1241157848" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The impact of the Baltimore bridge collapse on shipping and supply chains

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1241116112/1241116113" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The container ship Dali after it ran into and collapsed the Francis Scott Key Bridge on Tuesday in Baltimore. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Friday

U.S.-EU plan would give Ukraine acrued interest from frozen Russian assets

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1240108516/1240108517" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

The battle for technological dominance between China and the U.S. rages on

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239753404/1239761063" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

What to do with Russia's Frozen $300 Billion; A Trek in Morocco's Atlas Mountains

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1196979795/1237641259" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A debate is centered on what to do with $300 billion in seized Russian assets

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1237398076/1237398077" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

Houthi fighters march during a rally of support for Palestinians in the Gaza Strip and against the U.S. strikes on Yemen, outside Sanaa, on Jan. 22. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

China is mostly quiet on Houthi attacks in the Red Sea

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1233255546/1233256050" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu (right) take part in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Alexander Garden on Defender of the Fatherland Day, in Moscow, Friday. Sergey Guneev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Sergey Guneev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo/AP

Biden announces over 500 new sanctions for Russia's war in Ukraine and Navalny death

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1233410578/1233585949" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saturday

Friday

A man holds a poster with a portrait of opposition leader Alexei Navalny during a protest in front of the Russian Embassy in Berlin on Friday. Navalny, who crusaded against official corruption and staged massive anti-Kremlin protests as President Vladimir Putin's fiercest foe, died Friday in the Arctic penal colony, Russia's prison agency said. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Markus Schreiber/AP

Thursday

China depends heavily on the Red Sea. Why isn't it doing more to stop rebel attacks?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1229964939/1229964940" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sunday

A paddle boarder heads out into the water in Eilat, Israel. Normally, Eilat's beaches and hotels would be busy with tourists. Ayman Oghanna for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ayman Oghanna for NPR

A seaside town shelters thousands of Israeli evacuees, but struggles without tourists

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1227892139/1227894003" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Tuesday

The University of Haifa on Mount Carmel, Haifa, Israel. Boaz Rottem/Alamy hide caption

toggle caption
Boaz Rottem/Alamy

The war in Gaza is leading to deep divisions at Israeli universities

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1226618464/1227119150" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Thursday

The war in Gaza is spilling over into Israeli universities

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1226958235/1226958236" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tuesday

Tuesday

Secretary of State Blinken makes his 4th trip to Israel since war with Hamas began

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1223626347/1223626348" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

Blinken is in Israel on his Mideast tour aimed at trying to contain the war in Gaza

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1223567708/1223567709" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

Tuesday

Why Canada is forced to reexamine its policies and its identity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1221570178/1221570179" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saturday

Many in the American business community are reconsidering their close ties to China

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1221436196/1221436197" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript