Jackie Northam Jackie Northam is NPR's International Affairs Correspondent. She is a veteran journalist who has spent three decades reporting on conflict, politics, and life across the globe.
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Jackie Northam

Paul Gibson works on the Geo-Spring hybrid water heater at General Electric's Louisville, Ky., plant. For many years, GE outsourced manufacturing of the water heater to a company in China. But in 2009, it decided to bring production back to the U.S. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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Jackie Northam/NPR

As Overseas Costs Rise, More U.S. Companies Are 'Reshoring'

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The Japanese drinks company Suntory plans to buy Beam Inc., which includes Jim Beam and Maker's Mark bourbon. They are shown next to Suntory's Yamazaki and Hakushu whiskies at Suntory headquarters in Tokyo on Tuesday. The deal makes Suntory one of the world's leading drinks companies in an industry where a handful of companies increasingly dominate the global market. Issei Kato/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Issei Kato/Reuters/Landov

A view of the Panama Canal last Thursday. The canal is being widened to accommodate larger ships, but the builders and the canal operators are locked in a dispute about who will pay the higher-than-expected costs to finish the project. Alejandro Bolivar/EPA /Landov hide caption

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Alejandro Bolivar/EPA /Landov

As Costs Soar, Who Will Pay For The Panama Canal's Expansion?

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The Bombardier Challenger 300 is one of the most popular midsize business jets in production. Canada-based Bombardier has boomed in the two decades since the North American Free Trade Agreement was signed. Todd Williamson/AP hide caption

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Todd Williamson/AP

Freshly caught catfish wriggle in large nets in Doddsville, Miss. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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Jackie Northam/NPR

A Norfolk Southern train pulls oil tank units on its way to the PBF Energy refinery in Delaware City, Del. As U.S. oil production outpaces its pipeline capacity, more and more companies are looking to the railways to transport crude oil. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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Trains Gain Steam In Race To Transport Crude Oil In The U.S.

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Police display some of the jewelry recovered from the 2008 robbery of Harry Winston jewelers in Paris. Thieves snatched loot estimated to be worth $105 million. Francois Guillot/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francois Guillot/AFP/Getty Images

Trade Gets Sluggish As The Shutdown Leaves Agencies Shortstaffed

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In May, a large piece of the General Motors Building in Manhattan was purchased by a Chinese real estate developer. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Asian Investors Find Hot Market In U.S. Properties

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President Obama says any military strike he makes against the Syrian government in retaliation for suspected chemical attacks would be limited. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

U.S. Marines with 4th Force Reconnaissance Company slide off F470 Combat Rubber Raiding Crafts during training in Waimanalo, Hawaii. The French company Zodiac has been the U.S. military's choice for inflatable rubber rafts for roughly two decades. Now the company is making the rafts in the U.S. Lance Cpl. Reece E. Lodder/Marine Corps Base Hawaii hide caption

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Lance Cpl. Reece E. Lodder/Marine Corps Base Hawaii