Jackie Northam Veteran journalist Jackie Northam reports and produces long-form news and in-depth feature reports on for NPR News. Her pieces can be heard on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition, as well as NPR newscasts.
Jackie Northam
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Jackie Northam

Correspondent, Foreign Affairs

Jackie Northam is Foreign Affairs correspondent for NPR news. The veteran journalist has more than two decades of experience covering the world's hot spots and reporting on a broad tapestry of international and foreign policy issues.

Based in Washington, D.C., Northam is assigned to the leading stories of the day, traveling regularly overseas to report the news - from Afghanistan and Pakistan, to earthquake-ravaged Haiti.

Northam just completed a five year stint as NPR's National Security Correspondent, covering US defense and intelligence policies. She led the network's coverage of the US military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, traveling regularly to the controversial base to report on conditions there, and on US efforts to prosecute detainees.

Northam spent more than a decade as a foreign correspondent. She reported from Beirut during the war between Hezbollah and Israel in 2006, from Iraq after the fall of Saddam Hussein, and from Saudi Arabia during the first Gulf War. She lived in and reported extensively from Southeast Asia, Indochina, and Eastern Europe, where she charted the fall of communism.

While based in Nairobi, Kenya, Northam covered the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. She managed to enter the country just days after the slaughter of ethnic Tutsis began by hitching a ride with a French priest who was helping Rwandans escape to neighboring Burundi.

A native of Canada, Northam's first overseas reporting post was London, where she spent seven years covering stories on Margaret Thatcher's Britain and efforts to create the European Union.

Northam has received multiple journalism awards during her career, including Associated Press awards, regional Edward R. Murrow awards, and was part of an NPR team journalists that won an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Story Archive

Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal waves during an official visit to the West Bank city of Ramallah in 2014. The Saudi billionaire was detained last month in Riyadh and has not been seen since. Abbas Momani/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Abbas Momani/AFP/Getty Images

People walk through Trump Tower in New York City in August. Condo prices in the building have fallen, according to journalist and author Tim O'Brien. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Several Trump Properties Suffer Financially (But Not Ones He Visits Often)

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An undated picture released by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency on Sept. 16 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un inspecting a launching drill of the Hwasong-12 ballistic missile at an undisclosed location. Kim vowed to complete North Korea's nuclear force despite sanctions, state media reported. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. To Impose More Sanctions On North Korea, But How Effective Will They Be?

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Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump, executive vice presidents at the Trump Organization, attend the Trump International Hotel And Tower Vancouver Grand Opening in February. Phillip Chin/Getty Images hide caption

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New Trump Hotel Set To Open In Heart Of The Mississippi Delta

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Trump Franchise Hotel To Open In Small Mississippi Town

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What's At Stake For Boeing In The Iran Deal

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Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch's Speech At Trump's D.C. Hotel Draws Criticism

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An exterior view of the entrance to the Trump International Hotel at the Old Post Office Building in Washington, D.C. Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images

Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch Criticized For Speech At Trump's D.C. Hotel

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Saudi Arabia Announces It Will Lift Ban And Allow Women To Drive

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China Cuts Off Bank Business With North Korea As Trump Announces New Sanctions

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President Trump's Decision On Iran Nuclear Deal Could Affect Boeing Sales

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Chinese Construction Company Inks Deal To Build Trump Golf Course In Dubai

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Russian President Vladimir Putin, infuriated with the sanctions of the Magnitsky Act, retaliated by imposing a ban on Russian adoptions. Sergei Bobylev/TASS News Agency Pool Photo via AP hide caption

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Sergei Bobylev/TASS News Agency Pool Photo via AP

Behind Support For 'Adoption,' A Web Of Clandestine Russian Advocates

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