Jackie Northam Jackie Northam is NPR's International Affairs Correspondent. She is a veteran journalist who has spent three decades reporting on conflict, politics, and life across the globe.
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Jackie Northam

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Jackie Northam 2018
Stephen Voss/NPR

Jackie Northam

International Affairs Correspondent

Jackie Northam is NPR's International Affairs Correspondent. She is a veteran journalist who has spent three decades reporting on conflict, politics, and life across the globe - from the mountains of Afghanistan and the desert sands of Saudi Arabia, to the gritty prison camp at Guantanamo Bay and the pristine beauty of the Arctic.

Northam spent more than a dozen years as an international correspondent living in London, Budapest, Bangkok, Phnom Penh, and Nairobi. She charted the collapse of communism, covered the first Gulf War from Saudi Arabia, counter-terrorism efforts in Pakistan, and reported from Iraq after the fall of Saddam Hussein.

Her work has taken her to conflict zones around the world. Northam covered the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, arriving in the country just four days after Hutu extremists began slaughtering ethnic Tutsis. In Afghanistan, she accompanied Green Berets on a precarious mission to take a Taliban base. In Cambodia, she reported from Khmer Rouge strongholds.

Throughout her career, Northam has put a human face on her reporting, whether it be the courage of villagers walking miles to cast their vote in an Afghan election despite death threats from militants, or the face of a rescue worker as he desperately listens for any sound of life beneath the rubble of a collapsed elementary school in Haiti.

Northam joined NPR in 2000 as National Security Correspondent, covering US defense and intelligence policies. She led the network's coverage of the Abu Ghraib abuse scandal and the US military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Her present beat focuses on the complex relationship between international business and geopolitics, including how the lifting of nuclear sanctions has opened Iran for business, the impact of China's efforts to buy up businesses and real estate around the world, and whether President Trump's overseas business interests are affecting US policy.

Northam has received multiple journalism awards during her career, including Associated Press awards and regional Edward R. Murrow awards, and was part of an NPR team of journalists who won an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award for "The DNA Files," a series about the science of genetics.

A native of Canada, Northam spends her time off crewing in the summer, on the ski hills in the winter, and on long walks year-round with her beloved beagle, Tara.

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The Nielsens' sheep farm sits on the edge of a fjord in southern Greenland. The family has owned and run the farm since 1972. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

In A Warming Greenland, A Farming Family Adapts To Drought — And New Opportunities

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Warming Temperatures Are Forcing People In Greenland To Change Their Lifestyles

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Iraqi demonstrators take cover from security forces behind trash cans during clashes in the city of Karbala on Thursday. Mohammed Sawaf /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Sawaf /AFP via Getty Images

Narsaq, a town of 1,200 in southern Greenland, sits near the Kvanefjeld project, one of two major rare earth mineral deposits in Greenland. The Arctic island has a wealth of rare earth resources that the U.S. has labeled as essential to national defense. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Greenland Is Not For Sale. But It Has Rare Earth Minerals America Wants

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Suriya Paprajong moved to Greenland in the winter of 2001. Some 18 years later, he has built up a life, including opening his own restaurant. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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A Tiny Thai Restaurant In Remote Greenland Serves Up Spice (And Whale Skin Soup)

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Norwegian Pvt. Ivan Sjoetun sits in the border post where Russian land can be seen out the window. The post is in the far northeast corner of Norway and offers a commanding view of this starkly beautiful area some 250 miles above the Arctic Circle. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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In A Remote Arctic Outpost, Norway Keeps Watch On Russia's Military Buildup

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Saudi Arabia Moving Forward With Plans To Sell Shares Of Aramco

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Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attends the Future Investment Initiative conference, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on Oct. 24, 2018. Many major executives backed out of the event after the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. This year, some of the big corporate names are expected to return. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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Since Khashoggi's Death, Saudi Arabia Struggles To Repair Its Reputation

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Saudis 'Haven't Actually Paid A Large Price' For Khashoggi Killing

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2 Congressional Panels To Hear From Acting Director Of National Intelligence

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Trump's Evolving Relationship With Saudi Arabia

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Saudi Arabia May Rethink IPO For State-Owned Oil Company After Attacks

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Drone Strikes Impact Saudi Oil Facilities

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