Joe Palca Joe Palca is a science correspondent for NPR.
Joe Palca, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Joe Palca

Smart phones contain a silicon chip inside the camera that might be used to detect rare, high energy particles from outer space. J. Yang/Courtesy of WIPAC hide caption

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J. Yang/Courtesy of WIPAC

Want To Do A Little Astrophysics? This App Detects Cosmic Rays

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Safe and small: The credit-card-sized test for anthrax destroys the deadly bacteria after the test completes. Courtesy of Sandia Nation hide caption

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Courtesy of Sandia Nation

Safer Anthrax Test Aims To Keep The Bioweapon From Terrorists

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Fossil Collection Calls Berkeley's Clock Tower Home

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Speeding Up Yeast's Evolution And What It Says About Cancer

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Robert Davies (standing) and the quartet during a performance of "The Crossroads Project." Musicians include (left to right) Robert Waters, Rebecca McFaul, Anne Francis Bayless and Bradley Ottesen. Andrew McCallister /Courtesy of The Crossroads Project hide caption

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Andrew McCallister /Courtesy of The Crossroads Project

Climate Scientist Tries Arts To Stir Hearts Regarding Earth's Fate

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NASA says this "blue marble" image is the most detailed true-color image of the entire Earth to date. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Satellite Set To Stream Daily Images Of Earth From Space

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On The Ant Highway, There's Never A Backup

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Unless there's a serious pileup, ants in traffic tend to bypass a collision and just keep going. A physicist has found a way to model this behavior with a mathematical equation. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Why Ants Handle Traffic Better Than You Do

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An artist's rendering of what Dearcmhara shawcrossi probably looked like in dinosaur times. Todd Marshall/University of Edinburgh hide caption

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Todd Marshall/University of Edinburgh

Ancient Scottish Sea Reptile Not 'Nessie,' But Just As Cute

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Scientists Bring The Sun Down To Earth To Learn How It Works

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Larkin Carey, an optical engineer with Ball Aerospace, examines two test mirror segments designed for the James Webb Space Telescope. The mirror for the scope is extremely powerful, but heavy and pricey. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Could Glitter Help Solve NASA's Giant Telescope Problem?

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Methane Bursts On Mars Could Hint At Previous Life

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Why Some Scientific Collaborations Are More Beneficial Than Others

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A blast from the past: Using data from four telescopes, NASA created this image of the first documented sighting of a supernova, made by Chinese astronomers in 185 A.D. NASA/JPL-Caltech/B. Williams hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/B. Williams

To Search For A New Supernova, Build A New Camera

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