Joe Palca Joe Palca is a science correspondent for NPR.
Joe Palca, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Joe Palca

Scientists Study Human Cancer Genes In Plants

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This graphic shows the path of Tuesday's solar eclipse and how much you can see from different places. The yellow band represents the path of totality, or the areas in which a total eclipse will be visible. Other areas will be able to see a partial solar eclipse. Michael Zeiler, greatamericaneclipse.com hide caption

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Michael Zeiler, greatamericaneclipse.com

Support structure for the thermal probe called "the mole." NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA Engineers Try To Remedy Stuck Probe On Mars

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Some cottonwood trees are home to microorganisms that are known methane producers. Sean Bagshaw/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Bagshaw/Science Source/Getty Images

Getting Fire From A Tree Without Burning The Wood

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An imbalance between matter and antimatter in the universe produced all the things in existence, including corned beef sandwiches. Erik Rank/Getty Images hide caption

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Erik Rank/Getty Images

Why Corned Beef Sandwiches — And The Rest Of The Universe — Exist

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Boarding Pass for Mars nasa.gov hide caption

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nasa.gov

NASA Wants To Send Your Name To Mars In 2020

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Dr. Kaiyu Hang/Yale University

If Drones Had 'Claws,' They Might Be Able To Fly For Longer

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InSight seismometer with protectiive wind cover deployed on Mars. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA's InSight Probe May Have Recorded First Sounds Of Marsquake

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George Berzsenyi mentored thousands of high school students in mathematics. Sara Stathas for NPR hide caption

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Sara Stathas for NPR

A Math Teacher's Life Summed Up By The Gifted Students He Mentored

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Laysan Albatross Kath Hudson/Hudson Works hide caption

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Kath Hudson/Hudson Works

Laysan Albatross: An Unexpected Attraction In Hawaii

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This illustration made available by NASA shows the Kepler space telescope, the planet-hunting spacecraft that launched in 2009. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

Young Astronomer Uses Artificial Intelligence To Discover 2 Exoplanets

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An artist's rendering shows a needle-like carbon nanotube delivering DNA through the wall of a plant cell. It also may be possible to use this method to inject a gene editing tool called CRISPR to alter a plant's characteristics for breeding. Courtesy of Markita del Carpio Landry hide caption

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Courtesy of Markita del Carpio Landry

Scientists Thread A Nano-Needle To Modify The Genes Of Plants

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NASA's Opportunity rover used its navigation camera to capture this northward view of tracks in May 2010 during its long trek to Mars' Endeavour crater. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA's Mars Rover Opportunity Is Officially Declared Dead

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A team of researchers in Boston has developed an insulin-delivery system that injects the medicine directly into the stomach wall, which is painless. Felice Frankel/MIT hide caption

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Felice Frankel/MIT

Avoiding The Ouch: Scientists Are Working On Ways To Swap The Needle For A Pill

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Why Morning People May Have A Health Edge Over Night People

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