Joe Palca Joe Palca is a science correspondent for NPR.

Harry Kroto, pictured in 1996, displays a model of the geodesic-shaped carbon molecules that he helped discover. Michael Scates/AP hide caption

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Michael Scates/AP

'Buckyballs' Solve Century-Old Mystery About Interstellar Space

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The Cryptsporidium parasite emerges from the oocyst ready to infect. Muthgapatti Kandasamy & Boris Striepen/Courtesy of University of Georgia hide caption

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Muthgapatti Kandasamy & Boris Striepen/Courtesy of University of Georgia

Progress In The Fight Against A Parasite That Causes Diarrheal Disease

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This is a calculated flood map for the city of St. Louis. Water depth goes from deep (dark blue) to shallow (white, light blue). Floodwater can come from the Illinois, Upper Mississippi and Missouri rivers, as well as from heavy local precipitation. Courtesy of Dag Lohmann/Katrisk hide caption

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Courtesy of Dag Lohmann/Katrisk

Flood Maps Can Get Much Sharper With A Little Supercomputing Oomph

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Scientists Investigate What Makes Us Itch

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Illlustration by Hanna Barczyk

How A Drunken Chipmunk Voice Helps Send A Public Service Message

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The 200-inch Hale Telescope, a masterpiece of engineering at Caltech's Palomar Observatory, was the world's largest telescope until 1993. Scott Kardel/Palomar Observatory/Courtesy of Palomar Observatory/California Institute of Technology hide caption

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Scott Kardel/Palomar Observatory/Courtesy of Palomar Observatory/California Institute of Technology

'Playing Around With Telescopes' To Explore Secrets Of The Universe

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California Observatory Discovers Two Large Planets Orbiting Nearby Star

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An artist's rendition of the HD 7924 planetary system — just 54 light-years away from Earth — shows newly discovered exoplanets c and d, which join Planet b. Karen Termaura, BJ Fulton/UH IfA hide caption

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Karen Termaura, BJ Fulton/UH IfA

Welcome To The Neighborhood: 2 Super-Earths Discovered

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The Hooker 100-inch reflecting telescope at the Mount Wilson Observatory, just outside Los Angeles. Edwin Hubble's chair, on an elevating platform, is visible at left. A view from this scope first told Hubble our galaxy isn't the only one. Courtesy of The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science Collection at the Huntington Library, San Marino, Calif. hide caption

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Courtesy of The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science Collection at the Huntington Library, San Marino, Calif.

Hubble's Other Telescope And The Day It Rocked Our World

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3-D Printers Are Changing The Way People Think About Manufacturing

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Blaze Bioscience is commercially developing the "paint," which glows when exposed to near-infrared light. Courtesy of Blaze Bioscience hide caption

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Courtesy of Blaze Bioscience

Doctors Test Tumor Paint In People

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Smart phones contain a silicon chip inside the camera that might be used to detect rare, high energy particles from outer space. J. Yang/Courtesy of WIPAC hide caption

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J. Yang/Courtesy of WIPAC

Want To Do A Little Astrophysics? This App Detects Cosmic Rays

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Safe and small: The credit-card-sized test for anthrax destroys the deadly bacteria after the test completes. Courtesy of Sandia Nation hide caption

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Courtesy of Sandia Nation

Safer Anthrax Test Aims To Keep The Bioweapon From Terrorists

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Fossil Collection Calls Berkeley's Clock Tower Home

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Speeding Up Yeast's Evolution And What It Says About Cancer

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