Joe Palca Joe Palca is a science correspondent for NPR.
Joe Palca, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Joe Palca

A Ball Dropped Through The Earth Becomes A Permanent Pendulum

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NASA Marks Curiosity's First Year On Mars

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This self-portrait of NASA's Mars rover Curiosity combines dozens of exposures taken by the rover's Mars Hand Lens Imager during the 177th Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity's work on Mars, plus three exposures taken during Sol 270 to update the appearance of part of the ground beside the rover. NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Wood fibers are coated with carbon nanotubes and then packed into small disks of metal. The sodium ions moving around in the wood fibers create an electric current. Heather Rousseau/NPR hide caption

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Heather Rousseau/NPR

All Charged Up: Engineers Create A Battery Made Of Wood

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Before And After: These near-infrared images of Uranus show the planet as seen without adaptive optics (left) and with the technology turned on (right). Courtesy of Heidi B. Hammel and Imke de Pater hide caption

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Courtesy of Heidi B. Hammel and Imke de Pater

Scientists Discover Rip Van Winkle Of The Plant World

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The small patch in the middle of the image is Aulacomnium turgidum, a type of bryophyte plant. Researchers in the Canadian Arctic say they are surprised the bryophytes were still green, even after being covered by ice. Courtesy of Caroline La Farge hide caption

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Courtesy of Caroline La Farge

From the May 29, 2013, 'Morning Edition': NPR's Joe Palca reports on the discovery

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