Sylvia Poggioli Sylvia Poggioli is senior European correspondent for NPR's foreign desk covering political, economic, and cultural news in Italy, the Vatican, Western Europe and the Balkans.
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Sylvia Poggioli 2011
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Sylvia Poggioli

Senior European Correspondent, Rome, Italy

Sylvia Poggioli is senior European correspondent for NPR's international desk covering political, economic, and cultural news in Italy, the Vatican, Western Europe and the Balkans. Poggioli's on-air reporting and analysis have encompassed the fall of communism in Eastern Europe, the turbulent civil war in the former Yugoslavia and how immigration has transformed European societies.

Since joining NPR's foreign desk in 1982, Poggioli has traveled extensively for reporting assignments. Most recently, she travelled to Norway to cover the aftermath of the brutal attacks by an ultra-rightwing extremist; to Greece, Spain, and Portugal for the latest on the euro-zone crisis; and the Balkans where the last wanted war criminals have been arrested.

In addition, Poggioli has traveled to France, Germany, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, Belgium, Austria, Sweden, and Denmark to produce in-depth reports on immigration, racism, Islam, and the rise of the right in Europe.

Throughout her career Poggioli has been recognized for her work with distinctions including: the WBUR Foreign Correspondent Award, the Welles Hangen Award for Distinguished Journalism, a George Foster Peabody and National Women's Political Caucus/Radcliffe College Exceptional Merit Media Awards, the Edward Weintal Journalism Prize, and the Silver Angel Excellence in the Media Award. Poggioli was part of the NPR team that won the 2000 Overseas Press Club Award for coverage of the war in Kosovo. In 2009, she received the Maria Grazia Cutulli Award for foreign reporting.

In 2000, Poggioli received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Brandeis University. In 2006, she received an honorary degree from the University of Massachusetts at Boston together with Barack Obama.

Prior to this honor, Poggioli was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences "for her distinctive, cultivated and authoritative reports on 'ethnic cleansing' in Bosnia." In 1990, Poggioli spent an academic year at Harvard University as a research fellow at Harvard University's Center for Press, Politics, and Public Policy at the Kennedy School of Government.

From 1971 to 1986, Poggioli served as an editor on the English-language desk for the Ansa News Agency in Italy. She worked at the Festival of Two Worlds in Spoleto, Italy. She was actively involved with women's film and theater groups.

The daughter of Italian anti-fascists who were forced to flee Italy under Mussolini, Poggioli was born in Providence, Rhode Island, and grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She graduated from Harvard College with a Bachelor's degree in Romance languages and literature. She later studied in Italy under a Fulbright Scholarship.

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Pope Francis reads from the window of his studio overlooking St. Peter's Square at the Vatican on Wednesday. On Thursday, the Vatican responded to the latest report of clergy abuse in the United States. Filippo Monteforte /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Italian Officials Say Dozens Of People May Have Died In Bridge Collapse

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Italian Bridge Partially Collapses, Sending Vehicles Crashing Below

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Rome's City Services Falling Behind

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NPR's Foreign Correspondents On Trump's Criticism Of Europe's Immigration Policy

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In a secret room located in Florence's church of San Lorenzo the walls are covered in drawings believed to be the work of Michelangelo and his disciples. Claudio Giovannini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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This Room Is Thought To Have Been Michelangelo's Secret Hideaway And Drawing Board

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Italy's Role In The EU Questioned After New Government Is Formed

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Law professor Giuseppe Conte, Italy's new prime minister designate, speaks to the media to present his ministers list after being appointed by Italian President Sergio Mattarella on Thursday in Rome, Italy. Antonio Masiello/Getty Images hide caption

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The Formation Of Italy's New Government Is Causing A Crisis With Global Implications

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Italy's designated Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte addresses the media after meeting with President Sergio Mattarella on Sunday in Rome. Conte abandoned efforts to form a government after Mattarella refused to accept his cabinet lineup. Alessandra Benedett/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Matteo Salvini, left, leader of Lega political party and Silvio Berlusconi, Leader of Forza Italia, speak to the media after meetings with Italian President Sergio Mattarella on Monday in Rome, Italy. Antonio Masiello/Getty Images hide caption

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Technicians attend a rehearsal of the show Universal Judgment: Michelangelo and the Secrets of the Sistine Chapel, directed by Marco Balich, on March 13 near the Vatican. The Vatican Museums, which house the Sistine Chapel, provided high-definition digital reproductions of the frescoes in the hall at a reduced rate because they acknowledged the educational value of the project. Alberto Pizzoli/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Sistine Chapel Gets Its Own High-Tech Spectacle, With Music By Sting

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Pope Francis waves to the crowd in St. Peter's Square on Sunday. Recent months have seen Francis become the target of criticism on various fronts, and his image as a charismatic reformer has suffered some hits. Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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After 5 Years As Pope, Francis' Charismatic Image Has Taken Some Hits

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