Sylvia Poggioli Sylvia Poggioli is senior European correspondent for NPR's foreign desk covering political, economic, and cultural news in Italy, the Vatican, Western Europe and the Balkans.
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Sylvia Poggioli

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Sylvia
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Sylvia Poggioli

Senior European Correspondent, Rome, Italy

Sylvia Poggioli is senior European correspondent for NPR's International Desk covering political, economic, and cultural news in Italy, the Vatican, Western Europe, and the Balkans. Poggioli's on-air reporting and analysis have encompassed the fall of communism in Eastern Europe, the turbulent civil war in the former Yugoslavia, and how immigration has transformed European societies.

Since joining NPR's foreign desk in 1982, Poggioli has traveled extensively for reporting assignments. These include going to Norway to cover the aftermath of the brutal attacks by a right-wing extremist; to Greece, Spain, and Portugal reporting on the eurozone crisis; and the Balkans where the last wanted war criminals have been arrested.

In addition, Poggioli has traveled to France, Germany, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, Belgium, Austria, Sweden, and Denmark to produce in-depth reports on immigration, racism, Islam, and the rise of the right in Europe.

She has also travelled with Pope Francis on several of his foreign trips, including visits to Cuba, the United States, Congo, Uganda, Central African Republic, Myanmar, and Bangladesh.

Throughout her career Poggioli has been recognized for her work with distinctions including the WBUR Foreign Correspondent Award, the Welles Hangen Award for Distinguished Journalism, a George Foster Peabody, National Women's Political Caucus/Radcliffe College Exceptional Merit Media Awards, the Edward Weintal Journalism Prize, and the Silver Angel Excellence in the Media Award. Poggioli was part of the NPR team that won the 2000 Overseas Press Club Award for coverage of the war in Kosovo. In 2009, she received the Maria Grazia Cutulli Award for foreign reporting.

In 2000, Poggioli received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Brandeis University. In 2006, she received an honorary degree from the University of Massachusetts Boston together with Barack Obama.

Prior to this honor, Poggioli was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences "for her distinctive, cultivated and authoritative reports on 'ethnic cleansing' in Bosnia." In 1990, Poggioli spent an academic year at Harvard University as a research fellow at Harvard University's Center for Press, Politics, and Public Policy at the Kennedy School of Government.

From 1971 to 1986, Poggioli served as an editor on the English-language desk for the Ansa News Agency in Italy. She worked at the Festival of Two Worlds in Spoleto, Italy. She was actively involved with women's film and theater groups.

The daughter of Italian anti-fascists who were forced to flee Italy under Mussolini, Poggioli was born in Providence, Rhode Island, and grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in romance languages and literature. She later studied in Italy under a Fulbright Scholarship.

Story Archive

A Landmark Fraud And Corruption Trial Opens At The Vatican

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The Vatican Is Holding Its Biggest Criminal Trial In Modern History

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Pope Francis Said To Be In Good Condition Following Colon Surgery

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Astronomical text books in Latin are displayed at the Vatican Observatory. Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

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The Vatican's Space Observatory Wants To See Stars And Faith Align

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Pope Francis prepares to leave after celebrating a special Mass for the Myanmar faithful last month at the Vatican. On Tuesday, Francis issued new canon law focused on sexual abuse, fraud and the attempted ordination of women. Remo Casilli/Pool via AP hide caption

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The Pope Is Toughening Church Laws On Sex Abuse, Fraud And The Ordination Of Women

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Giuseppe Dave Seke (center) plays a superhero who helps save his neighborhood from gentrification in Netflix's Italian-language series Zero. It's Italy's first TV series with a predominantly Black cast. Francesco Berardinelli/Netflix hide caption

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In New Italian Netflix Series 'Zero,' A Black Hero Makes Invisibility His Superpower

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Cable Car In Northern Italy Falls To The Ground Killing 14 People

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Visitors Will Get Gladiator's Point Of View With Roman Colosseum's New Floor

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The Russian Embassy in Rome on Wednesda. Italy has ordered two Russian Embassy officials expelled and arrested an Italian Navy captain on spying charges after police caught the Italian allegedly giving classified documents to one of the Russians in exchange for money. Alessandra Tarantino/AP hide caption

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As Italy's COVID-19 Cases Rise, Prime Minister Calls For Restrictions

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Pope Francis Closes Out Trip To Iraq

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