Julie Rovner Julie Rovner is a health policy correspondent for NPR specializing in the politics of health care.
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"Democrats call it 'Medicare-for-all' because it sounds good, but in reality, it actually ends Medicare in its current form," Speaker of the House Paul Ryan asserted in a speech at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 8. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Nationally gathered statistics suggest that nearly half of graduating physicians in 2017 owed more than $200,000 in student debt. Cargo/Getty Images hide caption

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Cargo/Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (from left), Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and Vice President Pence met on Capitol Hill Tuesday, ahead of meetings with Republican senators. Democrats vow to challenge Kavanaugh's nomination in upcoming hearings. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

In his new job overseeing health coverage for 1.2 million workers and their families, Atul Gawande says he hopes to find specific ways to make health care more efficient and the solutions exportable. Dan Bayer /The Aspen Institute via Flickr hide caption

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Dan Bayer /The Aspen Institute via Flickr

Charlie Wood of Charlottesville, Va., plays with bubbles during a May 4, 2017, rally near the Capitol to oppose proposed changes to the Affordable Care Act. Charlie was born a few months prematurely, and her mother, Rebecca (left), fears changes to the health law will negatively affect her care. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc.

On March 21, 2010, Rep. Bart Stupak (D-Mich.), alongside fellow anti-abortion Democrats, holds up a copy of an executive order from President Barack Obama guaranteeing no federal funding for abortion. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., the ranking member, and Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, meet before the start of a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, the morning after they reached a deal to resume federal payments to health insurers that President Donald Trump had halted. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Opponents of abortion rights rallied outside the U.S. Supreme Court during The March for Life on Friday in Washington, D.C. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Kelley Mui helps a client sign up for health insurance through the Affordable Care Act on Dec. 15 at the Midwest Asian Health Association in Chicago. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Trump Ends Health Care Subsidies: Who Will Be Affected?

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Sens. Lindsey Graham (from left), Bill Cassidy and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell take questions during a press conference Tuesday. Graham and Cassidy were among the co-sponsors of a proposal to overhaul the Affordable Care Act. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Path Forward In Health Care Remains Uncertain For Both Parties

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People who buy their own health insurance and make too much to get subsidies are most likely to feel the pain of an unstable market. PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images

The federal CHIP program funds health care for almost 9 million children. Terry Vine/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Terry Vine/Blend Images/Getty Images