David Schaper David Schaper is a NPR National Desk reporter based in Chicago.
Doby Photography /NPR
David Schaper 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

David Schaper

Reporter, National Desk, Chicago

David Schaper is a NPR National Desk reporter based in Chicago.

In this role, he covers news in Chicago and around the Midwest. Additionally he reports on a broad range of important social, cultural, political, and business issues in the region.

The range of Schaper's reporting has included profiles of service members killed in Iraq, and members of a reserve unit returning home to Wisconsin. He produced reports on the important political issues in key Midwest battleground states, education issues related to "No Child Left Behind," the bankruptcy of United Airlines as well as other aviation and transportation issues, and the devastation left by tornadoes, storms, blizzards, and floods in the Midwest.

Prior to joining NPR, Schaper spent nine years working as an award-winning reporter and editor for Chicago Public Radio's WBEZ-FM. For three years he covered education issues, reporting in-depth on the problems, financial and otherwise, plaguing Chicago's public schools.

In 1996, Schaper was named assistant news editor, managing the station's daily news coverage and editing a staff of six. He continued general assignment reporting, covering breaking news, politics, transportation, housing, sports, and business.

When he left WBEZ, Schaper was the station's political reporter, editor, and a frequent fill-in news anchor and program host. Additionally, he served as a frequent guest panelist on public television's Chicago Tonight and Chicago Week in Review.

Since beginning his career at Wisconsin Public Radio's WLSU-FM, Schaper worked in Chicago as a writer and editor for WBBM-AM and as a reporter and anchor for WXRT-FM. He worked at commercial stations WMAY-AM in Springfield, IL; and WIZM-AM and FM in La Crosse, WI; and at public stations WSSU-FM (now WUIS) and WDCB-FM in in Illinois.

Schaper earned a Bachelor of Science at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and an Master of Arts from the University of Illinois-Springfield.

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Story Archive

An annual report by the American Road and Transportation Builders Association notes that there are now nearly 56,000 bridges nationwide that are structurally deficient. Both Democrats and Republicans say they're willing to work together on a plan to rebuild the nation's roads, bridges, transit and water systems. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Bridging The Partisan Divide: Can Infrastructure Unite Democrats And Republicans?

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FAA Warns Pilots Of Sensor Problems In Boeing 737s

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Despite a new congressional mandate to set minimum seat widths and legroom standards, the FAA is unlikely to expand airline seat size anytime soon. Johan Marengrd/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Cramped Legroom On Flights Unlikely To Change, Despite Congressional Mandate

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Bankruptcy Protection May Be Sears' Last Chance For Survival

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A bridge damaged by Hurricane Michael can be seen Friday in Mexico Beach, Fla. The most powerful hurricane ever known to have hit the Florida Panhandle has left transportation and communication infrastructure in shambles, slowing relief efforts. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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A Mobil gas station in Haverhill, Mass. in 1999. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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It's Been 25 Years Since The Federal Gas Tax Went Up

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The U.S. Senate passed a bill Wednesday to reauthorize the Federal Aviation Administration, including provisions that require the FAA to set a minimum size for commercial airplane seats. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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More Than 30,000 Steelworkers Threatening To Strike Across The U.S.

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Boeing Calls Back Retired Workers To Help Keep Up With Supply Chain

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The Role Of Logistics In Disaster Management

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Vehicles were directed onto U.S. 501 in Myrtle Beach, S.C., Tuesday. The state government ordered traffic to use all the lanes on the route leading away from the coast to facilitate evacuations ahead of Hurricane Florence. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Hurricane Florence: Travel Begins To Snarl As Storm Closes In

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Hurricane Prep Challenges Transportation Networks

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Political Shocker: Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel Won't Seek Re-Election

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With wife Amy Rule by his side, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel announces Tuesday at City Hall in Chicago that he will not seek a third term in office. Stacey Wescott/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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