David Schaper David Schaper is a NPR National Desk reporter based in Chicago.
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David Schaper

Boeing Will Temporarily Stop Making Its 737 Max Jetliners

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Boeing May Stop 737 Max Jet Assembly Line

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FAA Administrator Defends Agency Before Congress In Wake Of 737 Max Debacle

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A Boeing 737 MAX aircraft owned by Ryanair parked at Boeing's Renton, Washington factory in October. All 737 Max planes remain officially "grounded" worldwide. Gary He/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary He/Getty Images

737 Max Scandal Cuts Boeing's Once Rock-Solid Image

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Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg testifies before a Senate committee last week on the 737 Max plane crashes. A lawmaker asked him if he was taking a cut in pay, prompting the CEO to give up his bonuses. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Boeing Company President and Chief Executive Officer Dennis Muilenburg, right, and Boeing Commercial Airplanes Vice President and Chief Engineer John Hamilton faced intense questioning about what the company knew and when. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Boeing CEO Faces Tough Questions From Lawmakers Over Safety Of 737 Max

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Boeing President and CEO Dennis Muilenburg appeared before the Senate Transportation Committee on future of the grounded 737 Max on Tuesday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Boeing's Cultural Shift

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As Fallout From The 737 Max Crisis Continues, The Cost To Boeing Is Growing

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Boeing says it is replacing Kevin McAllister (shown in 2017) as the head of its commercial airplanes unit, as repercussions continue from two 737 Max crashes that killed hundreds of people. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Pilots' 2016 Messages Show Concerns With Boeing System

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