David Schaper David Schaper is a NPR National Desk reporter based in Chicago.
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David Schaper

The Boeing headquarters is seen amid the coronavirus pandemic on April 29, in Arlington, Va. Boeing announced sweeping cost-cutting measures Wednesday after reporting a first-quarter loss of $641 million following the hit to the airline business from the coronavirus pandemic. Olivier Douliery /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery /AFP via Getty Images

Boeing Cuts Its Workforce Due To The Coronavirus Crisis

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Boeing's Bottom Line Reels From Coronavirus, 737 Max Groundings

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Boeing CEO Dave Calhoun pictured in January, told shareholders Monday the aviation industry will be much different after the coronavirus pandemic. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

When airlines cancel flights and offer no other options to get to your destination within a reasonable amount of time, they are legally obligated to offer a refund. Kay Fochtmann/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Kay Fochtmann/Getty Images/EyeEm

Airlines Offer Vouchers, Credits For Canceled Flights. Customers Want Cash

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Grounded Boeing 737 Max airplanes fill a parking area adjacent to Boeing Field in Seattle on Feb. 19. Boeing said it will begin opening plants in Washington state in phases, starting April 20. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

The plunge in demand for air travel during the coronavirus crisis is reflected on an airport screen in New Orleans on April 4. Carlos Barria/Reuters hide caption

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Carlos Barria/Reuters

Boeing Mulls Federal Relief Package That Comes With Strings

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A screen shows canceled incoming flights at TF Green International Airport in Warwick, R.I. on March 30, 2020, during the novel coronavirus outbreak. Joseph Prezioso /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso /AFP via Getty Images

An empty corridor at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York last month. Social distancing to slow the spread of the coronavirus leaves little demand for flights. Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

Delta and the other major airlines are applying for federal relief payments to help them get through the slowdown caused by the coronavirus outbreak. Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

A lone passenger walks past the north checkpoint at Denver International Airport on April 1, which was closed because of a lack of traffic as a statewide stay-at-home order remains in effect to help reduce the spread of the coronavirus. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

To Stay Aloft With Federal Aid, Airlines Must Keep Flying

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Federal Relief Aid To Airlines Comes With Strings Attached

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