David Schaper David Schaper is a NPR National Desk reporter based in Chicago.
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David Schaper

National Transportation Safety Board: Boeing Made Faulty Assumptions Designing 737 Max

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Changes To Boeing's Safety Protocols Are Getting Mixed Reviews

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Grounded Since March, FAA Will Give An Update On Boeing's 737 Max

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Families Impacted By Boeing 737 Max Crashes Give Emotional Testimony

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A sign at the Miami International Airport shows cancelled flights after American Airlines initially grounded its Boeing 737 Max planes in March. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Airlines Cancel Boeing Max Flights Into November; Holiday Flights Could Be Next

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Southwest Airlines is among the companies that grounded Boeing 737 MAX aircraft because of a software failure that caused fatal crashes of Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines planes. The FAA said Wednesday it has found a new flaw in the plane that needs to be fixed. Ralph Freso/Getty Images hide caption

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Ralph Freso/Getty Images

FAA Finds New Problem With 737 Max Jets, Delaying Their Return To Flight

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Capt. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger, accompanied by other pilots and former FAA administrator Randy Babbitt, speaks during a House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure hearing on the status of the Boeing 737 Max in Washington, D.C. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

TSA Braces For Record Airport Crowds During Summer Travel Season

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A Boeing 737 Max operated by Air Canada comes in for a landing on March 27 at Boeing Field in Seattle. In addition to problems detected with the 737 Max, the FAA says there is a new issue with some 737s: They may have faulty parts on their wings. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

A Boeing 737 Max 8 jetliner being built for Turkish Airlines takes off on a test flight in Renton, Wash., on May 8. Passenger flights remain grounded worldwide as investigations continue into two fatal crashes involving the 737 Max aircraft. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Grounded Planes Expected To Interfere With Summer Travel

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Boeing Moves A Step Closer To Resolving 737 Max Problems

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