David Schaper David Schaper is a NPR National Desk reporter based in Chicago.
Doby Photography /NPR
David Schaper 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

David Schaper

Reporter, National Desk, Chicago

David Schaper is a NPR National Desk reporter based in Chicago.

In this role, he covers news in Chicago and around the Midwest. Additionally he reports on a broad range of important social, cultural, political, and business issues in the region.

The range of Schaper's reporting has included profiles of service members killed in Iraq, and members of a reserve unit returning home to Wisconsin. He produced reports on the important political issues in key Midwest battleground states, education issues related to "No Child Left Behind," the bankruptcy of United Airlines as well as other aviation and transportation issues, and the devastation left by tornadoes, storms, blizzards, and floods in the Midwest.

Prior to joining NPR, Schaper spent nine years working as an award-winning reporter and editor for Chicago Public Radio's WBEZ-FM. For three years he covered education issues, reporting in-depth on the problems, financial and otherwise, plaguing Chicago's public schools.

In 1996, Schaper was named assistant news editor, managing the station's daily news coverage and editing a staff of six. He continued general assignment reporting, covering breaking news, politics, transportation, housing, sports, and business.

When he left WBEZ, Schaper was the station's political reporter, editor, and a frequent fill-in news anchor and program host. Additionally, he served as a frequent guest panelist on public television's Chicago Tonight and Chicago Week in Review.

Since beginning his career at Wisconsin Public Radio's WLSU-FM, Schaper worked in Chicago as a writer and editor for WBBM-AM and as a reporter and anchor for WXRT-FM. He worked at commercial stations WMAY-AM in Springfield, IL; and WIZM-AM and FM in La Crosse, WI; and at public stations WSSU-FM (now WUIS) and WDCB-FM in in Illinois.

Schaper earned a Bachelor of Science at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and an Master of Arts from the University of Illinois-Springfield.

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Story Archive

What Happened On That Southwest Flight

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United Airlines planes parked at a terminal at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP

After Passenger Dragging Last Year, Airlines Improved Performance

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A Boeing 737 MAX 7 makes its first flight from Renton Municipal Airport, on March 16 in Renton, Wash. Many of the MAX models will not be targeted by Chinese tariffs. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images hide caption

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In Granite City, Ill., 500 laid-off steelworkers are being called back to work, a result of President Trump's steep tariffs that go into effect Friday on imported steel. David Schaper/NPR hide caption

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Illinois Town Tries To Show It Is More Than Just Steel

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Illinois Steelworkers React To Tariffs

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The Winners And Losers Of Trump's $1.5 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

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Damage done to the Hoboken Terminal in New Jersey after a commuter train crash in September 2016. Federal investigators attribute this accident and one in New York to engineers' untreated sleep apnea. Chris O'Neil/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Neil/AP

An aerial view of the site in Cayce, S.C., where an Amtrak passenger train (bottom right) slammed into a CSX freight train early Sunday morning. At least two Amtrak crew members were killed and more than 100 people injured, authorities said. Jeff Blake/AP hide caption

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Jeff Blake/AP

A service dog named Orlando rests on the foot of its trainer, John Reddan, while sitting inside a United Airlines plane at Newark Liberty International Airport during a training exercise last year. United Airlines wants to see more paperwork before passengers fly with an emotional support animal. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Infrastructure Experts Wondering Where Funding Would Come From For Trump's Plan

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Who Stops Working When The Government Shuts Down

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