Ari Shapiro Ari Shapiro is co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning newsmagazine.
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Ari Shapiro

Ari Shapiro Stephen Voss/NPR hide caption

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Stephen Voss/NPR

Ari Shapiro

Stephen Voss/NPR

Ari Shapiro

Host, All Things Considered

Ari Shapiro has been one of the hosts of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine, since 2015. During his first two years on the program, listenership to All Things Considered grew at an unprecedented rate, with more people tuning in during a typical quarter-hour than any other program on the radio.

Shapiro has reported from above the Arctic Circle and aboard Air Force One. He has covered wars in Iraq, Ukraine, and Israel, and he has filed stories from dozens of countries and most of the 50 states.

Shapiro spent two years as NPR's International Correspondent based in London, traveling the world to cover a wide range of topics for NPR's news programs. His overseas move came after four years as NPR's White House Correspondent during President Barack Obama's first and second terms. Shapiro also embedded with the campaign of Republican Mitt Romney for the duration of the 2012 presidential race. He was NPR's Justice Correspondent for five years during the George W. Bush Administration, covering debates over surveillance, detention, and interrogation in the years after Sept. 11.

Shapiro is a frequent guest analyst on television news programs, and his reporting has been consistently recognized by his peers. The Columbia Journalism Review honored him with a laurel for his investigation into disability benefits for injured American veterans. The American Bar Association awarded him the Silver Gavel for exposing the failures of Louisiana's detention system after Hurricane Katrina. He was the first recipient of the American Judges' Association American Gavel Award for his work on U.S. courts and the American justice system. And at age 25, Shapiro won the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for an investigation of methamphetamine use and HIV transmission.

An occasional singer, Shapiro makes guest appearances with the "little orchestra" Pink Martini, whose recent albums feature several of his contributions, in multiple languages. Since his debut at the Hollywood Bowl in 2009, Shapiro has performed live at many of the world's most storied venues, including Carnegie Hall in New York, The Royal Albert Hall in London, and L'Olympia in Paris.

Shapiro was born in Fargo, North Dakota, and grew up in Portland, Oregon. He is a magna cum laude graduate of Yale. He began his journalism career as an intern for NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg, who has also occasionally been known to sing in public.

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Patrick Jarenwattananon/NPR

Rachel Barenbaum's 'A Bend In The Stars' Tells A Tale Of Injustice And Romance

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Cage The Elephant's Social Cues is out now. Neil Krug/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Neil Krug/Courtesy of the artist

Cage The Elephant Processes Grief With 'Social Cues'

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Scribner

Real Photos Inspire A Fictional Life In 'Feast Your Eyes'

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The Libro de los Epítomes, a guidebook to the 16th century library of Hernando Colón, recently turned up in a manuscript archive in Denmark. Suzanne Reitz/Arnamagnæan Institute, University of Copenhagen hide caption

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Suzanne Reitz/Arnamagnæan Institute, University of Copenhagen

Christopher Columbus' Son Had An Enormous Library. Its Catalog Was Just Found

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Weyes Blood's latest album Titanic Rising goes from nostalgic and abstract to deeply personal. Kathryn Vetter Miller/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Kathryn Vetter Miller/Courtesy of the artist

Weyes Blood Meditates On Climate Change And Learns To Cope With Loss

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Eva Noblezada, who plays Eurydice, and the Broadway cast of Hadestown. Matthew Murphy/Courtesy of Hadestown, The Musical hide caption

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Matthew Murphy/Courtesy of Hadestown, The Musical

Anaïs Mitchell's 'Hadestown' Musical Makes Its Broadway Debut

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Gentoo penguins sit on an Antarctic iceberg in a scene from the new Netflix nature documentary series Our Planet. Sophie Lanfear/Silverback/Netflix hide caption

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Sophie Lanfear/Silverback/Netflix

'Our Planet' Nature Documentary Addresses The 800-Pound Gorilla — Human Impact

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Workers repair the roof of a small shop while a woman hangs clothing to dry among debris in Beira, Mozambique. The city was badly damaged after Cyclone Idai hit on March 14. Guillem Sartorio/Getty Images hide caption

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Guillem Sartorio/Getty Images

He Thought His City Was Prepared For Big Storms. Then Cyclone Idai Hit

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HHS Secretary Alex Azar at a White House roundtable discussion of health care prices in January. Azar tells NPR his office is now in "active negotiations and discussion" with drugmakers on how to make HIV prevention medicines more available and "cost-effective." Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

How HHS Secretary Reconciles Proposed Medicaid Cuts, Stopping The Spread Of HIV

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Caminantes walk back toward Venezuela on the road between Bogotá and Socorro, Colombia. Thousands cross the border each day. Many head back to their home country after failing to find work or shelter. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Chronicles Of A Venezuelan Exodus: More Families Flee The Crisis On Foot Every Day

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Knopf

The Internet May Be Just As Omniscient As God In 'Kaddish.com'

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Artist Kadir Nelson illustrates Kwame Alexander's poem "The Undefeated" in a new picture book. Kadir Nelson/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt hide caption

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Kadir Nelson/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

This Is For 'The Undefeated': A New Picture Book Celebrates Black Brilliance

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Many Pregnant Women Are Among Those Leaving Venezuela

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A Path No One Would Choose To Walk: 350 Miles With The Caminantes

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Young men carry luggage from Venezuela into Colombia under the Simón Bolívar International Bridge. Tensions are rising in this border area, where many Venezuelans are seeking refuge and are anxious for change back home. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

'Time To Act': Venezuelans Who Fled To Colombia Are Eager To Oust Maduro

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