Ari Shapiro Ari Shapiro is co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning newsmagazine.

A view of the opening of COP21 on climate change Monday in Paris. More than 150 world leaders are meeting for the 21st Session of the Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images

A Tale Of Dread And Duck Breasts: One Chef's Nightmare, Retold

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Between France And Russia, Presidents Seek Common Ground In Syria

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Words To The Wise: The Family Phrases That Stay With Us

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Addiction counselor John Fisher says prescriptions for medicines to help people wean themselves from opioid drugs are part of the appeal of the clinic he operates in Blountville, Tenn. Blake Farmer/NPR hide caption

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When Drug Treatment For Narcotic Addiction Never Ends

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Drug Treatment Slots Are Scarce For Pregnant Women

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Jessica Roberts and her father, Alan Roberts, who has struggled with addiction himself. They are both clean and hope to break the cycle of addiction with the newest generation of their family. Mallory Yu/NPR hide caption

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Listen to part one of this story

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Tenn. Law Targets Pregnant Women Who Are Drug Addicts

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Meet some of the nightmarish parasites that live in London's Natural History Museum. Fortunately, they reside in jars. Rich Preston for NPR hide caption

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Fleas Are Great! But Watch Out For A Worm That Looks Like Vermicelli

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An Odd Group Of 5: Roommates Welcome Syrian Refugee Into Toledo, Ohio, Home

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Omar holds his daughter, Taiba, at the playground near the family's new home in Toledo. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Among The Lucky Few: Syrian Family Rebuilds In America's Heartland

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Returning To Syria For Love: Why A Refugee Plans To Leave The U.S.

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Oregon Shooting Dredges Conversation On Guns Back To Surface

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Songdo, outside Seoul, was envisioned as a futuristic international business hub, drawing residents from all over the world. Instead, this young city has become populated mostly by Koreans. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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A South Korean City Designed For The Future Takes On A Life Of Its Own

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After Losing A City, Afghan Forces Fight To Push Back Taliban Advance

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