Ari Shapiro Ari Shapiro is co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning newsmagazine.
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Ari Shapiro

Civil Rights Panel Has Gone Wrong, Critics Say

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George Washington leads his troops across the Delaware River in 1776 during the Revolutionary War in this painting by Emanuel Leutze. AP hide caption

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Distrusting Government: As American As Apple Pie

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Obama: Hospitals Must Grant Same-Sex Visitations

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In Prague on Thursday, President Obama and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev signed an arms reduction treaty. But fears of an attack by a nuclear-armed superpower have given way to concerns about a nuclear-armed terrorist. Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images

New Nuclear Threat Tops Summit's Agenda

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Justice Stevens' Departure Gives Obama Opportunity

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Brand Obama: A Hit Abroad, But What About Loyalty?

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Current law punishes people who possess crack, which is much cheaper than powder, 100 times more heavily than people who possess powder cocaine. AP hide caption

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