Ari Shapiro Ari Shapiro is co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning newsmagazine.

Ari Shapiro Stephen Voss/NPR hide caption

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Stephen Voss/NPR

Ari Shapiro

Stephen Voss/NPR

Ari Shapiro

Host, All Things Considered

Ari Shapiro is a co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning newsmagazine.

He has reported from above the Arctic Circle and aboard Air Force One. He has covered wars in Iraq, Ukraine, and Israel, and he has filed stories from five continents. (Sorry, Australia.)

Shapiro was previously NPR's International Correspondent based in London, from where he traveled the world covering a wide range of topics for NPR's national news programs.

He joined NPR's international desk in 2014 after four years as White House Correspondent during President Barack Obama's first and second terms. In 2012, Shapiro embedded with the presidential campaign of Republican Mitt Romney. He was NPR Justice Correspondent for five years during the George W. Bush Administration, covering one of the most tumultuous periods in the Department's history.

Shapiro is a frequent guest analyst on television news programs, and his reporting has been consistently recognized by his peers. The Columbia Journalism Review honored him with a laurel for his investigation into disability benefits for injured American veterans. The American Bar Association awarded him the Silver Gavel for exposing the failures of Louisiana's detention system after Hurricane Katrina. He was the first recipient of the American Judges' Association American Gavel Award for his work on U.S. courts and the American justice system. And at age 25, Shapiro won the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for an investigation of methamphetamine use and HIV transmission.

An occasional singer, Shapiro makes guest appearances with the "little orchestra" Pink Martini, whose recent albums feature several of his contributions. Since his debut at the Hollywood Bowl in 2009, Shapiro has performed live at many of the world's most storied venues, including Carnegie Hall in New York, L'Olympia in Paris, and Mount Lycabettus in Athens.

Shapiro was born in Fargo, North Dakota, and grew up in Portland, Oregon. He is a magna cum laude graduate of Yale. He began his journalism career as an intern for NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg, who has also occasionally been known to sing in public.

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Story Archive

Melinda and Bill Gates in Kirkland, Washington, in February. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Bill Gates Addresses 'Tough Questions' On Poverty And Power

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Manuel, junto con uno de sus hijos después de su liberación, cerca de la escuela primaria de la urbanización. Todavía no ha recibido sus papeles para trabajar. Por eso, su hijo mayor sigue siendo el sostén de la familia y su educación ha quedado interrumpida por el momento. Christina Cala/NPR hide caption

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Padre, Esposo E Inmigrante: Detenido Y Con El Riesgo De Ser Deportado

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Beloved by thousands, Sue the Tyrannosaurus rex is moving from her home in the main exhibition hall of Chicago's Field Museum to her own private suite on the second floor. Courtesy of The Field Museum hide caption

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Courtesy of The Field Museum

Sue The T. Rex Is Making Big Moves With Her Big Bones

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The Sankuanz shoes for shoes are meant to protect the first pair of sneakers from dirt and damage. Courtesy of Sankuanz hide caption

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Courtesy of Sankuanz

In True Meta Fashion, These Are Shoes For Your Shoes

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The stock market swung dramatically Wednesday, ending about where it started the day — after record losses earlier in the week. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

White House Says Despite Stock Market Volatility, Economy Is Doing Well

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Justin Timberlake performs during the Super Bowl LII halftime show on Feb. 4, 2018. Christopher Polk/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Polk/Getty Images

As The Pop World Seeks Accountability, Justin Timberlake Seems Lost In The Woods

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How To Understand The Philosophy Of 'Groundhog Day' And Live Life By Its Message

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Gurneys to remove bodies from the Heaven's Gate cult house are shown in front of the house in the 9,200 sq.-foot mansion in the Rancho Santa Fe gated community in San Diego, Calif., March 27, 1997. AP hide caption

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AP

For 'Heaven's Gate' Podcast Host, The Cult Story Hits Close To Home

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Encore: Chris Stapleton Dives Into His Archives For 'From A Room: Volume 2'

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Manuel, shown with his family, first came to the United States illegally more than two decades ago. He was one of the 143,470 immigrants arrested in the interior of the country last year by immigration authorities. Jed Conklin for NPR hide caption

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Jed Conklin for NPR

A Father, A Husband, An Immigrant: Detained And Facing Deportation

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In a rush to buy journalist and author Michael Wolff's book Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House, buyers have mistakenly purchased Randall Hansen's book of a similar name, Fire and Fury: The Allied Bombing of Germany, 1942-1945. Leon Neal/Getty Images hide caption

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Author Of The Other 'Fire And Fury' Book Says Business Is Booming

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Lea Berman, White House social secretary for President George W. Bush, looks over flower arrangements in the State Dining Room before a state dinner for U.S. governors. Rich Lipski/Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Former White House Social Secretaries On The Value Of 'Treating People Well'

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Jolenta Greenberg and Kristen Meinzer of the podcast, "By The Book," share self-help secrets from books they've lived. zygotehasnobrain/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Want A New You For The New Year? These Books Might Actually Help

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Dr. Timothy Leary, an advocate for LSD, working at his desk. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Nixon's Manhunt For The High Priest Of LSD In 'The Most Dangerous Man In America'

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