Ari Shapiro Ari Shapiro is co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning newsmagazine.

Ari Shapiro Stephen Voss/NPR hide caption

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Stephen Voss/NPR

Ari Shapiro

Stephen Voss/NPR

Ari Shapiro

Host, All Things Considered

Ari Shapiro is a co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning newsmagazine.

He has reported from above the Arctic Circle and aboard Air Force One. He has covered wars in Iraq, Ukraine, and Israel, and he has filed stories from five continents. (Sorry, Australia.)

Shapiro was previously NPR's International Correspondent based in London, from where he traveled the world covering a wide range of topics for NPR's national news programs.

He joined NPR's international desk in 2014 after four years as White House Correspondent during President Barack Obama's first and second terms. In 2012, Shapiro embedded with the presidential campaign of Republican Mitt Romney. He was NPR Justice Correspondent for five years during the George W. Bush Administration, covering one of the most tumultuous periods in the Department's history.

Shapiro is a frequent guest analyst on television news programs, and his reporting has been consistently recognized by his peers. The Columbia Journalism Review honored him with a laurel for his investigation into disability benefits for injured American veterans. The American Bar Association awarded him the Silver Gavel for exposing the failures of Louisiana's detention system after Hurricane Katrina. He was the first recipient of the American Judges' Association American Gavel Award for his work on U.S. courts and the American justice system. And at age 25, Shapiro won the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for an investigation of methamphetamine use and HIV transmission.

An occasional singer, Shapiro makes guest appearances with the "little orchestra" Pink Martini, whose recent albums feature several of his contributions. Since his debut at the Hollywood Bowl in 2009, Shapiro has performed live at many of the world's most storied venues, including Carnegie Hall in New York, L'Olympia in Paris, and Mount Lycabettus in Athens.

Shapiro was born in Fargo, North Dakota, and grew up in Portland, Oregon. He is a magna cum laude graduate of Yale. He began his journalism career as an intern for NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg, who has also occasionally been known to sing in public.

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Story Archive

Allan Monga, a Deering High School junior, won Poetry Out Loud contests at school and at the state level. He was initially denied entry to the national competition because he's an asylum seeker and not a U.S. citizen. Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images

Asylum-Seeking Student Says Nothing Can Stand Between Him And Poetry

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Naia Izumi is the winner of the 2018 Tiny Desk Contest. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Meet Naia Izumi, The 2018 Tiny Desk Contest Winner

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A man rides a LimeBike in Washington, DC. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

#ScootersBehavingBadly: U.S. Cities Race To Keep Up With Small Vehicle Shares

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The U.S. Army's Autonomous Remote Engagement System is mounted on the Picatinny Lightweight Remote Weapon System and coupled with an M240B machine gun. It's part of a program that reduces the time to identify targets using automatic target detection and user-specified target selection. U.S. Army hide caption

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U.S. Army

Autonomous Weapons Would Take Warfare To A New Domain, Without Humans

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Outgoing European human rights Commissioner Nils Muiznieks (L) shares a joke with the Dalai Lama at the Council of Europe in Strasbourg, France, in 2016. Frederick Florin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederick Florin/AFP/Getty Images

'It's A Very Different World Now,' Says Outgoing Human Rights Commissioner

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Police officers in Lawrence, Kan. watch thunderstorms move past the city in 2008. Orlin Wagner/AP hide caption

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Orlin Wagner/AP

Basketball, Marijuana And Poetry: These Police Tweet More Than Crime Alerts

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Earlonne Woods (left) and Nigel Poor are behind the podcast Ear Hustle, which is now in its second season. Courtesy of Ear Hustle/Radiotopia from PRX hide caption

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Courtesy of Ear Hustle/Radiotopia from PRX

Behind 'Ear Hustle,' The Podcast Made In Prison

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A team of contractors works on the renovation of a home in Phoenix. A decade after the U.S. housing crisis, some old habits are back, including house flipping. Caitlin O'Hara for NPR hide caption

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Caitlin O'Hara for NPR

A Decade After The Bubble Burst, House Flipping Is On The Rise

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How Phoenix's Real Estate Market Is Faring 10 Years After Housing Crisis

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Patrons leave all kinds of messages on the vintage typewriter at Literati bookstore in Ann Arbor, Mich. Mike Gustafson hide caption

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Mike Gustafson

'Notes From A Public Typewriter' Muse On Everything From Cats To Commencement

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It took Brynjar Karl Birgisson 11 months to complete the world's largest Titanic replica, using only Legos. Courtesy of Titanic Museum Attraction hide caption

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Courtesy of Titanic Museum Attraction

Builder Of World's Largest Titanic Replica In Lego Says His Autism Is A Gift

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'Two Sisters' Follows Norwegian Teenagers Who Left Home To Join ISIS In Syria

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A still from Far Cry 5 shows the fictional apocalyptic cult that the video game follows. Ubisoft hide caption

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Ubisoft

An Americana Hymnal For The Doomsday Cult Of 'Far Cry 5'

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Author Naomi Alderman, whose novel The Power won the 2017 Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction, in front of the Women's Prize Library at the Royal Festival Hall in London. Tabatha Fireman/Getty Images For Baileys hide caption

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Tabatha Fireman/Getty Images For Baileys

In Naomi Alderman's Podcast, Listeners Walk Into The Story

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