Ari Shapiro Ari Shapiro is co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning newsmagazine.
Ari Shapiro
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Ari Shapiro

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Ari Shapiro
Stephen Voss/NPR

Ari Shapiro

Host, All Things Considered

Ari Shapiro has been one of the hosts of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine, since 2015. During his first two years on the program, listenership to All Things Considered grew at an unprecedented rate, with more people tuning in during a typical quarter-hour than any other program on the radio.

Shapiro has reported from above the Arctic Circle and aboard Air Force One. He has covered wars in Iraq, Ukraine, and Israel, and he has filed stories from dozens of countries and most of the 50 states.

Shapiro spent two years as NPR's International Correspondent based in London, traveling the world to cover a wide range of topics for NPR's news programs. His overseas move came after four years as NPR's White House Correspondent during President Barack Obama's first and second terms. Shapiro also embedded with the campaign of Republican Mitt Romney for the duration of the 2012 presidential race. He was NPR's Justice Correspondent for five years during the George W. Bush Administration, covering debates over surveillance, detention and interrogation in the years after Sept. 11.

Shapiro's reporting has been consistently recognized by his peers. He was part of an NPR team that won a national Edward R. Murrow award for coverage of the Trump Administration's asylum policies on the US-Mexico border. The Columbia Journalism Review honored him with a laurel for his investigation into disability benefits for injured American veterans. The American Bar Association awarded him the Silver Gavel for exposing the failures of Louisiana's detention system after Hurricane Katrina. He was the first recipient of the American Judges' Association American Gavel Award for his work on U.S. courts and the American justice system. And at age 25, Shapiro won the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for an investigation of methamphetamine use and HIV transmission.

An occasional singer, Shapiro makes frequent guest appearances with the "little orchestra" Pink Martini, whose recent albums feature several of his contributions, in multiple languages. Since his debut at the Hollywood Bowl in 2009, Shapiro has performed live at many of the world's most storied venues, including Carnegie Hall in New York, The Royal Albert Hall in London and L'Olympia in Paris. In 2019 he created the show "Och and Oy" with Tony Award winner Alan Cumming, and they continue to tour the country with it.

Shapiro was born in Fargo, North Dakota, and grew up in Portland, Oregon. He is a magna cum laude graduate of Yale. He began his journalism career as an intern for NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg, who has also occasionally been known to sing in public.

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Story Archive

Trans Journalists: It's 'A Privilege' To Tell The Stories Of The Trans Community

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A woman stands with her baby while viewing memorials dedicated to George Floyd in front of the entrance of Cup Foods, the site where George Floyd died. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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How A Minnesota Paper Is Covering The Chauvin Trial From The Black Perspective

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Publisher Of Minneapolis Black-Owned Newspaper Speaks On Coverage Of Chauvin Trial

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The History Of Trans Children In Medicine

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HarperCollins

In 'Caul Baby,' A Rare Gift Becomes A Double-Edged Sword

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Angel Bat Dawid is a vocalist and multi-instrumentalist rooted in Chicago's jazz scene. Mara Arteaga/Rhizomes Films hide caption

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Mara Arteaga/Rhizomes Films

Play It Forward: Angel Bat Dawid Knows How To Deliver Emotion Through Song

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Leslie Jordan hopes that, no matter how you were raised, you can listen and enjoy Company's Comin'. Miller Mobley/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Miller Mobley/Courtesy of the artist

On 'Company's Comin',' Leslie Jordan And Gospel Greats Sing For Joy

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Dr. Rachel Levine during her confirmation hearing in February. In an NPR interview Thursday, Levine questions state measures limiting transgender rights. Tom Brenner/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Rachel Levine: Transgender Health Care Is An Equity Issue, Not A Political One

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U.K. Ambassador to the U.S. Karen Pierce, pictured in a previous role in 2018, talked with NPR about the country's outline of its future foreign policy. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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U.K., U.S. Working Closely On Countering 'Almost Gangsterish' Russia, U.K. Envoy Says

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Arthur and Abrams have collaborated on similar projects in the past, including a rap opera about Muhammad Ali in 2017. O'Neil Arnold/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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O'Neil Arnold/Courtesy of the artist

'Music Is Music': A Rapper And A Conductor Cross Centuries In Louisville

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Democratic Rep. Andy Kim of New Jersey recently spoke out on Twitter about being discriminated against for his ethnicity while he served as an adviser in the State Department. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Rep. Andy Kim On State Department Racism: 'My Own Government Questioned My Loyalty'

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Book Concierge: Book Club Ideas

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Graywolf Press

In 'Abundance,' Measuring A Life In Dollars And Cents

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Devonté Hynes' new album, Fields, is nominated for two classical Grammy awards this year. Nick Harwood/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Nick Harwood/Courtesy of the artist

Play It Forward: Devonté Hynes' Grammys Surprise And Biggest Inspirations

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Sheila Tyson, a Jefferson County commissioner in Birmingham, Ala., is fighting to get more doses of COVID-19 vaccines into communities of color in her state. Andi Rice/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andi Rice/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Alabama Official On Vaccine Rollout: 'How Can This Disparity Exist In This Country?'

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