Ari Shapiro Ari Shapiro is co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning newsmagazine.
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Ari Shapiro

Ari Shapiro Stephen Voss/NPR hide caption

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Stephen Voss/NPR

Ari Shapiro

Stephen Voss/NPR

Ari Shapiro

Host, All Things Considered

Ari Shapiro has been one of the hosts of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine, since 2015. During his first two years on the program, listenership to All Things Considered grew at an unprecedented rate, with more people tuning in during a typical quarter-hour than any other program on the radio.

Shapiro has reported from above the Arctic Circle and aboard Air Force One. He has covered wars in Iraq, Ukraine, and Israel, and he has filed stories from dozens of countries and most of the 50 states.

Shapiro spent two years as NPR's International Correspondent based in London, traveling the world to cover a wide range of topics for NPR's news programs. His overseas move came after four years as NPR's White House Correspondent during President Barack Obama's first and second terms. Shapiro also embedded with the campaign of Republican Mitt Romney for the duration of the 2012 presidential race. He was NPR's Justice Correspondent for five years during the George W. Bush Administration, covering debates over surveillance, detention, and interrogation in the years after Sept. 11.

Shapiro is a frequent guest analyst on television news programs, and his reporting has been consistently recognized by his peers. The Columbia Journalism Review honored him with a laurel for his investigation into disability benefits for injured American veterans. The American Bar Association awarded him the Silver Gavel for exposing the failures of Louisiana's detention system after Hurricane Katrina. He was the first recipient of the American Judges' Association American Gavel Award for his work on U.S. courts and the American justice system. And at age 25, Shapiro won the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for an investigation of methamphetamine use and HIV transmission.

An occasional singer, Shapiro makes guest appearances with the "little orchestra" Pink Martini, whose recent albums feature several of his contributions, in multiple languages. Since his debut at the Hollywood Bowl in 2009, Shapiro has performed live at many of the world's most storied venues, including Carnegie Hall in New York, The Royal Albert Hall in London, and L'Olympia in Paris.

Shapiro was born in Fargo, North Dakota, and grew up in Portland, Oregon. He is a magna cum laude graduate of Yale. He began his journalism career as an intern for NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg, who has also occasionally been known to sing in public.

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Story Archive

In the summer of 1927, Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston drove together from Alabama to New York. Just outside Savannah, Ga., they gave a ride to a young person running away from a chain gang. An essay Hughes wrote about that encounter has recently resurfaced: Read it here. Jack Delano/Library of Congress hide caption

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Jack Delano/Library of Congress

In Lost Essay, Langston Hughes Recounts Meeting A Young Chain Gang Runaway

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Betty Who's latest album, Betty, is out now. Ben Cope/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Ben Cope/Courtesy of the artist

Betty Who Creates 'A Space That People Feel Joy In' With Independent Debut

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Indya Moore walks the runway as Angel in the FX series Pose. Michael Parmelee/FX hide caption

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Michael Parmelee/FX

'Pose' Choreographer Creates A Safe Space — On The Runway

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Divino Niño (L to R): Javier Forero, Pierce Codina, Guillermo Rodriguez and Camilo Medina. Rachel Cabitt/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Rachel Cabitt/Courtesy of the artist

Divino Niño Uses Old Friendships And Retro Sounds To Create 'A Little Vacation'

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Honoree Abigail Disney speaks during the 2018 Women's Media Awards at Capitale on Nov. 1, 2018, in New York City. Mike Coppola/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Coppola/Getty Images

Disney Heiress Calls For Wealth Tax: 'We Have To Draw A Line'

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Dr. Marijuana Pepsi Vandyck graduated from Cardinal Stritch University in Wisconsin this month with a doctorate in higher education leadership. Courtesy of Marijuana Pepsi Vandyck hide caption

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Courtesy of Marijuana Pepsi Vandyck

Dr. Marijuana Pepsi Won't Change Her Name 'To Make Other People Happy'

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Marijuana Pepsi Fends Off The Jokes To Earn Her PhD

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'Damaged' Tales Of Love, In Fiction From 'BoJack' Creator Raphael Bob-Waksberg

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"Everything's new to me, with purity and innocence," Carlos Santana says. "It's all in how your heart perceives things." Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

For Santana, 'Africa Speaks' Album Is About 'Manifesting Divine Voodoo'

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This illustration taken in April 2018 shows the logo of the iTunes app of Apple displayed on a tablet screen in Paris. Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images

Remembering iTunes' Cultural Significance

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Tyndall Air Force Base Still Faces Challenges In Recovering From Hurricane Michael

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"I was very influenced to sing more in Arabic and to express my Sudanese identity much more confrontationally and much more honestly," Ahmed Gallab of Sinkane says. Daniel Dorsa/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Daniel Dorsa/Courtesy of the artist

Sinkane Harnesses Hope For Sudan In 'Dépaysé' Album

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Shelly and Sam Summers stand with daughter Gabby in front of a makeshift shelter on their rural Bay County property. They opened their backyard to people who were homeless after Hurricane Michael. At the peak, about 50 people lived there. Now, there are 18. "We still have our home," Shelly says. "They have nothing. So if we can at least offer them the comforts of home, it was worth it." William Widmer for NPR hide caption

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William Widmer for NPR

Nearly 8 Months After Hurricane Michael, Florida Panhandle Feels Left Behind

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Rain obscures the view of a tornado on May 28 in Lawrence, Kan. Kyle Rivas/Getty Images hide caption

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Kyle Rivas/Getty Images

Scientists Know How Tornadoes Form, But They Are Hard To Predict

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Florida Panhandle Still Feeling Effects Of Michael As New Hurricane Season Begins

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