Ari Shapiro Ari Shapiro is co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning newsmagazine.
Ari Shapiro
Stories By

Ari Shapiro

Stephen Voss/NPR
Ari Shapiro
Stephen Voss/NPR

Ari Shapiro

Host, All Things Considered

Ari Shapiro has been one of the hosts of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine, since 2015. During his first two years on the program, listenership to All Things Considered grew at an unprecedented rate, with more people tuning in during a typical quarter-hour than any other program on the radio.

Shapiro has reported from above the Arctic Circle and aboard Air Force One. He has covered wars in Iraq, Ukraine, and Israel, and he has filed stories from dozens of countries and most of the 50 states.

Shapiro spent two years as NPR's International Correspondent based in London, traveling the world to cover a wide range of topics for NPR's news programs. His overseas move came after four years as NPR's White House Correspondent during President Barack Obama's first and second terms. Shapiro also embedded with the campaign of Republican Mitt Romney for the duration of the 2012 presidential race. He was NPR's Justice Correspondent for five years during the George W. Bush Administration, covering debates over surveillance, detention and interrogation in the years after Sept. 11.

Shapiro's reporting has been consistently recognized by his peers. He was part of an NPR team that won a national Edward R. Murrow award for coverage of the Trump Administration's asylum policies on the US-Mexico border. The Columbia Journalism Review honored him with a laurel for his investigation into disability benefits for injured American veterans. The American Bar Association awarded him the Silver Gavel for exposing the failures of Louisiana's detention system after Hurricane Katrina. He was the first recipient of the American Judges' Association American Gavel Award for his work on U.S. courts and the American justice system. And at age 25, Shapiro won the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for an investigation of methamphetamine use and HIV transmission.

An occasional singer, Shapiro makes frequent guest appearances with the "little orchestra" Pink Martini, whose recent albums feature several of his contributions, in multiple languages. Since his debut at the Hollywood Bowl in 2009, Shapiro has performed live at many of the world's most storied venues, including Carnegie Hall in New York, The Royal Albert Hall in London and L'Olympia in Paris. In 2019 he created the show "Och and Oy" with Tony Award winner Alan Cumming, and they continue to tour the country with it.

Shapiro was born in Fargo, North Dakota, and grew up in Portland, Oregon. He is a magna cum laude graduate of Yale. He began his journalism career as an intern for NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg, who has also occasionally been known to sing in public.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Bloomsbury Publishing

Home Sweet Labyrinth: Susanna Clarke's Mysterious 'Piranesi' Will Lock You In

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/911998413/912791497" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jason Wright joined the Washington Football Team as the new president while the team reckons with allegations of sexual harassment and changing a racist nickname. McKinsey & Company hide caption

toggle caption
McKinsey & Company

Jason Wright On Leading The Washington Football Team Amid Multiple Crises

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/907055200/907157499" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lianne La Havas says her new, self-titled album is her at her purest and most authentic. Hollie Fernando/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Hollie Fernando/Courtesy of the artist

Play It Forward: Lianne La Havas Stretches To New Heights

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/905926994/905926995" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Spoken word poet and musician Kae Tempest thinks that the act of paying extreme attention allows one to be more empathetic to others and to create art that resonates beyond the present moment. Julian Broad/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Julian Broad/Courtesy of the artist

Play It Forward: Kae Tempest Watches The World Vibrate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/903263225/903291223" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Amy Ray and Emily Saliers contemplate their place as queer artists in country on their latest album, Look Long, released in May. Jeremy Cowart/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Jeremy Cowart/Courtesy of the artist

Play It Forward: Indigo Girls' Amy Ray And Emily Saliers On Their 45-Year Kinship

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/901731412/901859904" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

White House Economic Adviser On Relief During The Pandemic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/901431771/901431772" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Harris County Public Health contact tracers are seen at work as they try to help stop the spread of the coronavirus outbreak in Houston, Texas, on July 22. Adrees Latif/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Adrees Latif/Reuters

California And Texas Health Officials: Mistrust A Major Hurdle For Contact Tracers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/901064505/901064506" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Linda Diaz is the winner of the 2020 Tiny Desk Contest. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the artist

Meet Linda Diaz, The Winner Of The 2020 Tiny Desk Contest

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/898907981/899060912" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

LouAnn Woodward, who leads the University of Mississippi Medical Center, supports a statewide mask mandate. But she says state leaders are "in a pickle," based on medical advice against popular opposition. Joe Ellis/UMMC Photography hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Ellis/UMMC Photography

Mississippi On Track To Become No. 1 State For New Coronavirus Cases Per Capita

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/898656250/898675004" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Author Akwaeke Emezi Scottie O. hide caption

toggle caption
Scottie O.

'Vivek Oji' Is Very Much Alive In This Boundary-Breaking New Novel

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/898545741/898674998" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Members of the "Wall of Moms" march during a Black Lives Matter protest at the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse last week in Portland, Ore. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

How Portland's Racist History Informs Today's Protests

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/897298379/897345091" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Maria Sherman's new book gives critical consideration to a too-often maligned phenomenon within pop music: the boy band. Alex Fine/Courtesy of Black Dog & Leventhal hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Fine/Courtesy of Black Dog & Leventhal

A New Book Traces The History Of Boy Bands, The Pop Phenomenon 'Larger Than Life'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/896334949/896334950" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

When it comes to the climate change, "you can see these vast changes in the future, and you can be worried about them, but you can still continue to do good and work in the moment for small things," says Zach St. George. Above, a sequoia in California's Giant Sequoia National Monument in July 2002. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David McNew/Getty Images

Believe It Or Not, Forests Migrate — But Not Fast Enough For Climate Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/896030567/896335022" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ed Bastian, CEO of Delta Air Lines, speaks during the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas in 2019. Early in the pandemic, Delta was losing $100 million each day. Now it's losing about $27 million a day. Steve Marcus/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Marcus/Reuters

Delta CEO: Airline's Pandemic Strategy Is 'Putting People Over Profits'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/895816246/895867550" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript