Ari Shapiro Ari Shapiro is co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning newsmagazine.
Ari Shapiro
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Ari Shapiro

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Ari Shapiro
Stephen Voss/NPR

Ari Shapiro

Host, All Things Considered

Ari Shapiro has been one of the hosts of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine, since 2015. During his first two years on the program, listenership to All Things Considered grew at an unprecedented rate, with more people tuning in during a typical quarter-hour than any other program on the radio.

Shapiro has reported from above the Arctic Circle and aboard Air Force One. He has covered wars in Iraq, Ukraine, and Israel, and he has filed stories from dozens of countries and most of the 50 states.

Shapiro spent two years as NPR's International Correspondent based in London, traveling the world to cover a wide range of topics for NPR's news programs. His overseas move came after four years as NPR's White House Correspondent during President Barack Obama's first and second terms. Shapiro also embedded with the campaign of Republican Mitt Romney for the duration of the 2012 presidential race. He was NPR's Justice Correspondent for five years during the George W. Bush Administration, covering debates over surveillance, detention and interrogation in the years after Sept. 11.

Shapiro's reporting has been consistently recognized by his peers. He has won two national Edward R. Murrow awards; one for his reporting on the life and death of Breonna Taylor, and another for his coverage of the Trump Administration's asylum policies on the US-Mexico border. The Columbia Journalism Review honored him with a laurel for his investigation into disability benefits for injured American veterans. The American Bar Association awarded him the Silver Gavel for exposing the failures of Louisiana's detention system after Hurricane Katrina. He was the first recipient of the American Judges' Association American Gavel Award for his work on U.S. courts and the American justice system. And at age 25, Shapiro won the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for an investigation of methamphetamine use and HIV transmission.

An occasional singer, Shapiro makes frequent guest appearances with the "little orchestra" Pink Martini, whose recent albums feature several of his contributions, in multiple languages. Since his debut at the Hollywood Bowl in 2009, Shapiro has performed live at many of the world's most storied venues, including Carnegie Hall in New York, The Royal Albert Hall in London and L'Olympia in Paris. In 2019 he created the show "Och and Oy" with Tony Award winner Alan Cumming, and they continue to tour the country with it.

Shapiro was born in Fargo, North Dakota, and grew up in Portland, Oregon. He is a magna cum laude graduate of Yale. He began his journalism career as an intern for NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg, who has also occasionally been known to sing in public.

Story Archive

Tamales stuffed with pork, chicken — even strawberries — star at this festival

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Pong was released by Atari 50 years ago

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The former Head of Trust and Safety at Twitter on working for CEO Elon Musk

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Yoel Roth used to be Twitter's Head of Trust & Safety until he resigned in early November. He worries about the changes Elon Musk is making to the platform. David Odisho/Getty Images hide caption

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Twitter's former safety chief warns Musk is moving fast and "breaking things"

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A civil resistance expert on the protests in China and Iran

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Bats use the same trick as death metal growlers and throat singers

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The first all-female referee team makes history at the World Cup

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A far-right extremism expert on the conviction of Oath Keepers founder Stewart Rhodes

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Soccer managers turn the World Cup sidelines into a fashion show

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U.S. bans Dominican sugar company over forced labor

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Law enforcement has used robots to investigate suspicious packages. Now, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors is considering a policy proposal that would allow SFPD's robots to use deadly force against a suspect. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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San Francisco considers allowing law enforcement robots to use lethal force

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A nurse's view as three viruses send Americans to hospitals

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The world's largest volcano is erupting for the first time since 1984

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Jim Obergefell and fellow plaintiff Luke Barlowe hug as they exit the Supreme Court on April 28, 2015 after oral arguments concerning whether same-sex marriage is a constitutional right. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Congress considers codifying same-sex marriage after long battle for gay rights

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