Ari Shapiro Ari Shapiro is co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning newsmagazine.
Ari Shapiro
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Ari Shapiro

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Ari Shapiro
Stephen Voss/NPR

Ari Shapiro

Host, All Things Considered

Ari Shapiro has been one of the hosts of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine, since 2015. During his first two years on the program, listenership to All Things Considered grew at an unprecedented rate, with more people tuning in during a typical quarter-hour than any other program on the radio.

Shapiro has reported from above the Arctic Circle and aboard Air Force One. He has covered wars in Iraq, Ukraine, and Israel, and he has filed stories from dozens of countries and most of the 50 states.

Shapiro spent two years as NPR's International Correspondent based in London, traveling the world to cover a wide range of topics for NPR's news programs. His overseas move came after four years as NPR's White House Correspondent during President Barack Obama's first and second terms. Shapiro also embedded with the campaign of Republican Mitt Romney for the duration of the 2012 presidential race. He was NPR's Justice Correspondent for five years during the George W. Bush Administration, covering debates over surveillance, detention and interrogation in the years after Sept. 11.

Shapiro's reporting has been consistently recognized by his peers. He was part of an NPR team that won a national Edward R. Murrow award for coverage of the Trump Administration's asylum policies on the US-Mexico border. The Columbia Journalism Review honored him with a laurel for his investigation into disability benefits for injured American veterans. The American Bar Association awarded him the Silver Gavel for exposing the failures of Louisiana's detention system after Hurricane Katrina. He was the first recipient of the American Judges' Association American Gavel Award for his work on U.S. courts and the American justice system. And at age 25, Shapiro won the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for an investigation of methamphetamine use and HIV transmission.

An occasional singer, Shapiro makes frequent guest appearances with the "little orchestra" Pink Martini, whose recent albums feature several of his contributions, in multiple languages. Since his debut at the Hollywood Bowl in 2009, Shapiro has performed live at many of the world's most storied venues, including Carnegie Hall in New York, The Royal Albert Hall in London and L'Olympia in Paris. In 2019 he created the show "Och and Oy" with Tony Award winner Alan Cumming, and they continue to tour the country with it.

Shapiro was born in Fargo, North Dakota, and grew up in Portland, Oregon. He is a magna cum laude graduate of Yale. He began his journalism career as an intern for NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg, who has also occasionally been known to sing in public.

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Story Archive

Grammy-nominated singer Andra Day, in a still from The United States Vs. Billie Holiday. Takashi Seida/Courtesy of Paramount Pictures Corporation hide caption

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Takashi Seida/Courtesy of Paramount Pictures Corporation

Andra Day On Portraying BilIie Holiday And The Enduring Strength Of 'Strange Fruit'

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Kelly Clements, United Nations deputy high commissioner for refugees, says that the Biden administration's promise to welcome more refugees into the U.S. sets an important tone on the international stage. Johan Ordonez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johan Ordonez/AFP via Getty Images

U.N. Official: Biden Plan To Boost Refugee Resettlement 'Sends Important Signal'

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Morehouse College President David Thomas wants to make it easier for the more than 2 million Black men who were never able to complete their plan to get a college degree. Brinley Hineman/AP hide caption

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Brinley Hineman/AP

New Morehouse College Program Encourages Black Men To Complete Unfinished Degrees

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Kurtis Smith gives the Moderna coronavirus vaccine to a resident at Red Hook Neighborhood Senior Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., on Monday. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Why The Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Has Gotten A Bad Rap — And Why That's Not Fair

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Anything for Selena weaves the life of the late Tejano singer together with that of the podcast's host, Maria Garcia. Illustration by Iliana Galvez/WBUR hide caption

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Illustration by Iliana Galvez/WBUR

The Podcast 'Anything For Selena' Tells A Story Larger Than The Artist's Life

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Riverhead

Overflowing 'Year Abroad' Is A Travelogue, A Coming-Of-Age Tale And A Mafia Thriller

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Registered Nurse Shyun Lin, left, administers Alda Maxis, 70, the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine at a pop-up vaccination site in the William Reid Apartments in Brooklyn, N.Y., on Jan. 23. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Early Data Shows Striking Racial Disparities In Who's Getting The COVID-19 Vaccine

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The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine requires storage in extremely frigid temperatures before it's thawed out for use. Moderna's vaccine also must be stored in very cold temperatures. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

They're A Precious Commodity, So Why Are Some COVID-19 Vaccines Going To Waste?

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Olympic Runner Alexi Pappas On Learning To Ask For Help

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Corine Dehabey, the director of programs for the Toledo office of US Together, pictured in a 2017 story. Today she says her organization is hopeful and excited for the changes coming under President Biden. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Refugee Resettlement Coordinator Is Hopeful For What Comes Next Under Biden

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In March of 2020, Robbie Dennis was transferred to the Louisiana State Penitentiary, known as Angola. The CDC first recommended that Americans wear masks on April 3; prisoners at Angola didn't receive them until June or July, Dennis says. Julie Dermansky for NPR hide caption

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Julie Dermansky for NPR

Correctional Facilities Are COVID-19 Hot Spots. Why Don't They Get Vaccine Priority?

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Inmates Are Among Most Vulnerable In The Pandemic. When Will They Get Vaccinated?

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Director Christopher Nolan (left) and actor John David Washington on the set of Tenet. Melinda Sue Gordon/Warner Bros. Entertainment hide caption

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Melinda Sue Gordon/Warner Bros. Entertainment

Christopher Nolan On 'Tenet' And Time, 'The Most Cinematic Of Subjects'

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A staff member at a health center displays a vial of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine this week in Cardiff, Wales. Justin Tallis/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Wisconsin Hospital Leader On Getting Ready For Vaccinations

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