Mike Shuster Award-winning journalist Mike Shuster is a foreign correspondent for NPR News. When not traveling abroad, Shuster covers issues of nuclear non-proliferation, weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the Pacific Rim.

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Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon speaks during a news conference in his offices on Nov. 21, 2005, in Jerusalem. Sharon announced his split from his right-wing Likud party to form a new political party, Kadima. He was on the way to re-election in 2006 when he suffered a stroke and fell into a coma from which he never awoke. David Silverman/Getty Images hide caption

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David Silverman/Getty Images

Ariel Sharon, Whose Life And Career Shaped Israeli History, Dies

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Iranian women look at a jewelry shop display in Tehran, Iran, in 2010. Iran now appears to be stockpiling gold in an attempt to stabilize its economy, which has been hit hard by Western sanctions. Atta Lenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Lenare/AFP/Getty Images

To Combat Sanctions, Iran Buys Up Gold

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An Iranian boy holds a tray of eggs at a grocery store in Tehran last month. From Sunday, Sept. 30, to Monday, Oct. 1, the Iranian currency lost nearly one-third of its value against the dollar. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

Signals From Iran Indicate Willingness To Talk

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Russia To Go It Alone On Nuke Disarmament

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An Iranian man checks the rates of foreign currencies at a currency exchange bureau in central Tehran on Sept. 29. The Iranian currency lost nearly one-third of its value in a day over the weekend. Maryam Rahmanian/UPI/Landov hide caption

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Maryam Rahmanian/UPI/Landov

Panic Rises In Iran As Currency Plunges To New Lows

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Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei delivers a speech in Tehran in July. Khamenei says Western-led sanctions will not force Iran to change its policies, but there are signs of other concerned voices in Iran. AP hide caption

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AP

As Sanctions Take A Toll, Debate In Iran Heats Up

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Report Finds Iran Still Prepping To Enrich Uranium

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IAEA Suspicious Of Iran's Parchin Military Base

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Iranians walk through the main bazaar in Tehran in January. Sanctions by the EU and U.S., plus political woes related to the Syrian uprising, have created the most serious crisis faced by Tehran since the 1980s. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

From All Sides, Iran Under Siege

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Ibrahim Ahmad, the son of the owner of the Imperial Bagpipe Manufacturing Co., tests a bagpipe at a factory in Sialkot, Pakistan. The Pakistani city is the largest producer of the instruments most commonly associated with Scotland. Farooq Naeem/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Farooq Naeem/AFP/Getty Images

In Pakistan, Sounds Of A Different Kind Of Drone

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Pakistani Prime Minister Raja Pervez Ashraf is greeted after his election in June. Just weeks later, many Pakistanis expect the nation's Supreme Court may soon attempt to force Ashraf from his position, as it did his predecessor. Rizwan Tabassum/Getty Images hide caption

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Rizwan Tabassum/Getty Images

It's Deja Vu As Pakistan's Political Crisis Deepens

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The Cost Of Women's Rights In Northwest Pakistan

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Pakistani border guards check trucks heading to Afghanistan, in the tribal area of Khyber last week. Qazi Rauf/AP hide caption

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Qazi Rauf/AP

'Hard Questions' Remain In U.S.-Pakistan Relations

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Pakistan Will Reopen NATO Supply Lines

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Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad delivers a speech under a portrait of Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, on June 2. The supreme leader has said repeatedly that nuclear weapons are un-Islamic and Iran will not pursue them. But in the West, many are skeptical. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

Iran's Nuclear Fatwa: A Policy Or A Ploy?

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