Susan Stamberg Nationally renowned broadcast journalist Susan Stamberg is a special correspondent for NPR.
Susan Stamberg 2010
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Susan Stamberg

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Susan Stamberg at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 21, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Susan Stamberg

Special Correspondent

Nationally renowned broadcast journalist Susan Stamberg is a special correspondent for NPR.

Stamberg is the first woman to anchor a national nightly news program, and has won every major award in broadcasting. She has been inducted into the Broadcasting Hall of Fame and the Radio Hall of Fame. An NPR "founding mother," Stamberg has been on staff since the network began in 1971.

Beginning in 1972, Stamberg served as co-host of NPR's award-winning newsmagazine All Things Considered for 14 years. She then hosted Weekend Edition Sunday, and now reports on cultural issues for Morning Edition and Weekend Edition Saturday.

One of the most popular broadcasters in public radio, Stamberg is well known for her conversational style, intelligence, and knack for finding an interesting story. Her interviewing has been called "fresh," "friendly, down-to-earth," and (by novelist E.L. Doctorow) "the closest thing to an enlightened humanist on the radio." Her thousands of interviews include conversations with Laura Bush, Billy Crystal, Rosa Parks, Dave Brubeck, and Luciano Pavarotti.

Prior to joining NPR, she served as producer, program director, and general manager of NPR Member Station WAMU-FM/Washington, DC. Stamberg is the author of two books, and co-editor of a third. Talk: NPR's Susan Stamberg Considers All Things, chronicles her two decades with NPR. Her first book, Every Night at Five: Susan Stamberg's All Things Considered Book, was published in 1982 by Pantheon. Stamberg also co-edited The Wedding Cake in the Middle of the Road, published in 1992 by W. W. Norton. That collection grew out of a series of stories Stamberg commissioned for Weekend Edition Sunday.

In addition to her Hall of Fame inductions, other recognitions include the Armstrong and duPont Awards, the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, The Ohio State University's Golden Anniversary Director's Award, and the Distinguished Broadcaster Award from the American Women in Radio and Television.

A native of New York City, Stamberg earned a bachelor's degree from Barnard College, and has been awarded numerous honorary degrees including a Doctor of Humane Letters from Dartmouth College. She is a Fellow of Silliman College, Yale University, and has served on the boards of the PEN/Faulkner Fiction Award Foundation and the National Arts Journalism Program based at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Stamberg has hosted a number of series on PBS, moderated three Fred Rogers television specials for adults, served as commentator, guest or co-host on various commercial TV programs, and appeared as a narrator in performance with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra and the National Symphony Orchestra. Her voice appeared on Broadway in the Wendy Wasserstein play An American Daughter.

Her late husband Louis Stamberg had his career with the State Department's agency for international development. Her son, Josh Stamberg, an actor, appears in various television series, films, and plays.

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Story Archive

The name Rumors of War is from a biblical passage Matthew 24:6: "You will hear of wars and rumors of wars, but see to it that you are not alarmed. Such things must happen, but the end is still to come." Travis Fullerton/Virginia Museum of Fine Arts hide caption

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Travis Fullerton/Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

The Salvador Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Fla., didn't let COVID-19 stop it from showcasing its "Midnight in Paris" exhibition. Above, the Spanish surrealist painter in 1964. Terry Fincher/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Terry Fincher/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

"She's challenging you to sit down in that chair," Los Angeles artist Alison Saar says of her 2019 sculpture, Set to Simmer. Jeff McLane/L.A. Louver hide caption

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Jeff McLane/L.A. Louver

'She's Challenging You': Alison Saar's Sculptures Speak To Race, Beauty, Power

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Ivo Faber/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn/Matthew Marks Gallery

With Surprising Sculptures, Katharina Fritsch Makes The Familiar Fun

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Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec's 1896 lithograph Woman Reclining — Waking Up from the portfolio Elles Norton Simon Museum hide caption

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Norton Simon Museum

Get A Glimpse Of Labor, Leisure And Everyday Life In Paris' Belle Époque

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Years ago, John Sonsini began approaching men in Los Angeles who were looking for work — and offering them modeling jobs. The results are on view in a show called Cowboy Stories & New Paintings. Above, Saul & Lorenzo, 2008. John Sonsini hide caption

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John Sonsini

Artist Says His Portraits Of Day Laborers Are Paintings — Not Statements

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How Irish, English And Australian Actresses Learned To Talk Like 'Little Women'

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Travis Fullerton/Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

1 Night In An Edward Hopper Hotel Room? It's Less Lonely Than You Might Think

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Our annual Hanukkah Lights celebrates stories of the season. Rachel Stallworth/Flickr hide caption

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Rachel Stallworth/Flickr

Hanukkah Lights 2019

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A worker stirs Ocean Spray cranberries in a bog set up in front of Rockefeller Center in October 2008. For decades, Susan Stamberg has managed to sneak her family's controversial cranberry relish recipe onto the air. Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mama Stamberg Takes Her Cranberry Relish Recipe To Ocean Spray's CEO

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In Albee's 'Occupant,' A Deceased Sculptor Defends Her Legacy

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William Merritt Chase's 1888 Study of Flesh Color and Gold, pastel on paper coated with mauve-gray grit National Gallery of Art hide caption

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National Gallery of Art

Versatile, Smudgy, Suitable For Women? Exhibition Traces The History Of Pastels

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