Susan Stamberg Nationally renowned broadcast journalist Susan Stamberg is a special correspondent for NPR.

The Carter Burden Gallery in Chelsea only shows works by artists who are at least 60 years old. Carter Burden Gallery hide caption

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Carter Burden Gallery

This New York Gallery Has An Unusual Age Limit: No Artists Younger Than 60

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Stone bust of the goddess Sakhmet. Brooklyn Museum/Gift of Dr. and Mrs. W. Benson Harer, Jr. hide caption

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Brooklyn Museum/Gift of Dr. and Mrs. W. Benson Harer, Jr.

No Kitten Around: Museum Exhibit Celebrates 'Divine Felines'

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It's great when generations get together to pass down family traditions, especially if the little ones might need a little extra time to get on board. Raquel Zaldivar/NPR hide caption

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Raquel Zaldivar/NPR

Mama Stamberg's Cranberry Relish Takes Heat From One Of The Family's Own

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Left: Johannes Vermeer's Lady Writing, 1665. Right: Caspar Netscher's Woman Feeding a Parrot, with a Page, 1666. National Gallery of Art, Washington hide caption

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National Gallery of Art, Washington

Dutch Artists Painted Their Patriotism With Pearls And ... Parrots?

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Phillips Collection curator Eliza Rathbone says Renoir was "at the height of his powers" when in he painted Luncheon of the Boating Party. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. hide caption

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The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.

Guess Who Renoir Was In Love With In 'Luncheon Of The Boating Party'

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Curator Paola Antonelli says the white T-shirt is both timeless and universal. Courtesy Shutterstock/SFIO CRACHO/ The Museum of Modern Art, New York hide caption

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Courtesy Shutterstock/SFIO CRACHO/ The Museum of Modern Art, New York

We Are What We Wear: Exhibition Examines Clothing That Changed The World

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'What She Ate': The Culinary Biographies Of Some Remarkable Women

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Harvey Dunn's 1918 oil painting The Sentry shows a soldier coming up from the trenches. "You see in his eyes what would later become known as the thousand-yard stare," says exhibit curator Peter Jakab. Hugh Talman/National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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Hugh Talman/National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution

Even In 'The War To End All Wars,' There Was Art Coming From The Trenches

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The porches of the 1890s Allison Buildings, shown above in 1910, were later enclosed to provide more space for patient beds. National Archives and Records Administration/National Building Museum hide caption

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National Archives and Records Administration/National Building Museum

'Architecture Of An Asylum' Tracks History Of U.S. Treatment Of Mental Illness

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Senior conservator of paintings Ann Hoenigswald works to fill in elements of Paul Cézanne's Riverbank c. 1895 in the National Gallery of Art's Paintings Conservation Lab in Washington, D.C. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

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Liam James Doyle/NPR

With Chemistry And Care, Conservators Keep Masterpieces Looking Their Best

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'Maudie' Paints Intimate Portrait Of Canadian Painter Maud Lewis

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Lewis used leftover house paint to brighten the walls of the tiny home in Marshalltown that she shared with her husband. Steve Farmer/Art Gallery of Nova Scotia hide caption

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Steve Farmer/Art Gallery of Nova Scotia

Listen to the Story

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Marlene Dietrich in a publicity photo for the film Dishonored (1931), in which she plays an Austrian spy. Eugene Robert Richee/Deutsche Kinemathek - Marlene Dietrich Collection Berlin / Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery hide caption

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Eugene Robert Richee/Deutsche Kinemathek - Marlene Dietrich Collection Berlin / Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery

Gallery Gives Movie Star Marlene Dietrich The Big-Picture Treatment

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Frédéric Bazille's The Family Gathering has none of the quick, airy brushstrokes his future impressionist peers would discover; but the sunshine is there, as are the bright colors. Musee d'Orsay, Paris/Courtesy of the National Gallery of Art hide caption

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Musee d'Orsay, Paris/Courtesy of the National Gallery of Art

Meet Frédéric Bazille, The Impressionist Painter Who Could Have Been

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