Susan Stamberg Nationally renowned broadcast journalist Susan Stamberg is a special correspondent for NPR.
Susan Stamberg
Antony Nagelmann

Susan Stamberg

Special Correspondent

Nationally renowned broadcast journalist Susan Stamberg is a special correspondent for NPR.

Stamberg is the first woman to anchor a national nightly news program, and has won every major award in broadcasting. She has been inducted into the Broadcasting Hall of Fame and the Radio Hall of Fame. An NPR "founding mother," Stamberg has been on staff since the network began in 1971.

Beginning in 1972, Stamberg served as co-host of NPR's award-winning newsmagazine All Things Considered for 14 years. She then hosted Weekend Edition Sunday, and now reports on cultural issues for Morning Edition and Weekend Edition Saturday.

One of the most popular broadcasters in public radio, Stamberg is well known for her conversational style, intelligence, and knack for finding an interesting story. Her interviewing has been called "fresh," "friendly, down-to-earth," and (by novelist E.L. Doctorow) "the closest thing to an enlightened humanist on the radio." Her thousands of interviews include conversations with Laura Bush, Billy Crystal, Rosa Parks, Dave Brubeck, and Luciano Pavarotti.

Prior to joining NPR, she served as producer, program director, and general manager of NPR Member Station WAMU-FM/Washington, DC. Stamberg is the author of two books, and co-editor of a third. Talk: NPR's Susan Stamberg Considers All Things, chronicles her two decades with NPR. Her first book, Every Night at Five: Susan Stamberg's All Things Considered Book, was published in 1982 by Pantheon. Stamberg also co-edited The Wedding Cake in the Middle of the Road, published in 1992 by W. W. Norton. That collection grew out of a series of stories Stamberg commissioned for Weekend Edition Sunday.

In addition to her Hall of Fame inductions, other recognitions include the Armstrong and duPont Awards, the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, The Ohio State University's Golden Anniversary Director's Award, and the Distinguished Broadcaster Award from the American Women in Radio and Television.

A native of New York City, Stamberg earned a bachelor's degree from Barnard College, and has been awarded numerous honorary degrees including a Doctor of Humane Letters from Dartmouth College. She is a Fellow of Silliman College, Yale University, and has served on the boards of the PEN/Faulkner Fiction Award Foundation and the National Arts Journalism Program based at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Stamberg has hosted a number of series on PBS, moderated three Fred Rogers television specials for adults, served as commentator, guest or co-host on various commercial TV programs, and appeared as a narrator in performance with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra and the National Symphony Orchestra. Her voice appeared on Broadway in the Wendy Wasserstein play An American Daughter.

Her late husband Louis Stamberg had his career with the State Department's agency for international development. Her son Josh Stamberg, an actor, has appeared in various television series, films, and plays.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Mama Stamberg's cranberry relish recipe. Ariel Zambelich & Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ariel Zambelich & Emily Bogle/NPR

Cranberry Relish: The NPR Recipe That Divides Thanksgiving Tables

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/666296027/668508633" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mark Bradford says he wanted his Spoiled Foot installation to make the viewer feel "as if the center of the room was no longer available." Joshua White/Courtesy Mark Bradford, Hauser & Wirth hide caption

toggle caption
Joshua White/Courtesy Mark Bradford, Hauser & Wirth

Memory Fuels Art And Activism In Mark Bradford's 'Tomorrow Is Another Day'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/657517100/658721738" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Corot's mother was a milliner and his father was a textile merchant — he paints many of his models in elaborate costumes. He made Jewish Woman of Algeria in 1870. Private Collection, Courtesy National Gallery of Art hide caption

toggle caption
Private Collection, Courtesy National Gallery of Art

At The End Of His Career, This 19th Century Artist Painted As He Pleased

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/653704714/653902803" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Artist Sam Gilliam is known for his vibrant, draped fabrics such as Swing from 1969. Smithsonian American Art Museum hide caption

toggle caption
Smithsonian American Art Museum

Hard At Work At 84, Artist Sam Gilliam Has 'Never Felt Better'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/640903173/643218478" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

From March 4 to September 3, conservator Chris Stavroudis is part of the exhibition Jackson Pollock's Number 1, 1949: A Conservation Treatment at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Brian Forrest/The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles hide caption

toggle caption
Brian Forrest/The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

A Jackson Pollock Painting Gets A Touch-Up — And The Public's Invited To Watch

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/634309516/635908005" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

These pointed-toe laced pumps, circa 1964, are made of green suede and grosgrain ribbon. Glenn Castellano/New-York Historical Society hide caption

toggle caption
Glenn Castellano/New-York Historical Society

Get Pumped: 100+ Fabulous Pairs Of Shoes Are On View In New York

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/623564631/628315308" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alberto Giacometti didn't sculpt heroes on horseback; he depicted everyday humans — and animals — struggling to get through the day. Above, his 1951 bronze sculpture Dog (Le chien). Cathy Carver/Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden/Smithsonian hide caption

toggle caption
Cathy Carver/Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden/Smithsonian

Giacometti's Sculptures Bare The Scars Of Our Daily Struggles

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/617638893/618163043" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Film director Jean Renoir grappled with his father's legacy. "I have spent my life trying to determine the extent of the influence of my father upon me," he wrote. Renoir is shown above filming his 1962 film, The Elusive Corporal. Agence France Presse/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Agence France Presse/Getty Images

Filmmaker Jean Renoir Inherited An Artist's Eye For Images

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/610483741/610905371" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Session Drummer Dave Tull On 'Texting And Driving'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/606716590/606716591" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mel Brooks' office is lined with awards — he's in the elite EGOT club, having won Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony awards. Danny Hajek/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Danny Hajek/NPR

Mel Brooks Says It's His Job To 'Make Terrible Things Entertaining'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/605297774/605944240" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As artist David Hockney recovered from a minor stroke, he decided to paint portraits of his friends. The result is "82 Portraits and 1 Still-life," an exhibit now on view at The Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Jean-Pierre Gonçalves de Lima/LACMA hide caption

toggle caption
Jean-Pierre Gonçalves de Lima/LACMA

What's It Like To Pose For David Hockney? We Asked The People In His Portraits

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/600962098/603093478" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

National guard troops patrol outside the Capitol in Washington, D.C. on April 5, 1968, one day after Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP/Getty Images

Spring 1968: Returning Home To A Smoke-Filled City And Nation In Crisis

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/599101315/599242032" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Hungarian-born French photographer Brassaï (born Gyula Halasz) is one of three photographers currently being featured at MOCA in Los Angeles. Baron/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Baron/Getty Images

3 Photographers Who Captured The Undersides Of Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/595610152/597863502" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript