Susan Stamberg Nationally renowned broadcast journalist Susan Stamberg is a special correspondent for NPR.
Susan Stamberg 2010
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Susan Stamberg

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Susan Stamberg at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 21, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Susan Stamberg

Special Correspondent

Nationally renowned broadcast journalist Susan Stamberg is a special correspondent for NPR.

Stamberg is the first woman to anchor a national nightly news program, and has won every major award in broadcasting. She has been inducted into the Broadcasting Hall of Fame and the Radio Hall of Fame. An NPR "founding mother," Stamberg has been on staff since the network began in 1971.

Beginning in 1972, Stamberg served as co-host of NPR's award-winning newsmagazine All Things Considered for 14 years. She then hosted Weekend Edition Sunday, and now reports on cultural issues for Morning Edition and Weekend Edition Saturday.

One of the most popular broadcasters in public radio, Stamberg is well known for her conversational style, intelligence, and knack for finding an interesting story. Her interviewing has been called "fresh," "friendly, down-to-earth," and (by novelist E.L. Doctorow) "the closest thing to an enlightened humanist on the radio." Her thousands of interviews include conversations with Laura Bush, Billy Crystal, Rosa Parks, Dave Brubeck, and Luciano Pavarotti.

Prior to joining NPR, she served as producer, program director, and general manager of NPR Member Station WAMU-FM/Washington, DC. Stamberg is the author of two books, and co-editor of a third. Talk: NPR's Susan Stamberg Considers All Things, chronicles her two decades with NPR. Her first book, Every Night at Five: Susan Stamberg's All Things Considered Book, was published in 1982 by Pantheon. Stamberg also co-edited The Wedding Cake in the Middle of the Road, published in 1992 by W. W. Norton. That collection grew out of a series of stories Stamberg commissioned for Weekend Edition Sunday.

In addition to her Hall of Fame inductions, other recognitions include the Armstrong and duPont Awards, the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, The Ohio State University's Golden Anniversary Director's Award, and the Distinguished Broadcaster Award from the American Women in Radio and Television.

A native of New York City, Stamberg earned a bachelor's degree from Barnard College, and has been awarded numerous honorary degrees including a Doctor of Humane Letters from Dartmouth College. She is a Fellow of Silliman College, Yale University, and has served on the boards of the PEN/Faulkner Fiction Award Foundation and the National Arts Journalism Program based at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Stamberg has hosted a number of series on PBS, moderated three Fred Rogers television specials for adults, served as commentator, guest or co-host on various commercial TV programs, and appeared as a narrator in performance with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra and the National Symphony Orchestra. Her voice appeared on Broadway in the Wendy Wasserstein play An American Daughter.

Her late husband Louis Stamberg had his career with the State Department's agency for international development. Her son, Josh Stamberg, an actor, appears in various television series, films, and plays.

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Story Archive

Augusta Savage was an artist, educator, activist and community leader. Her work is the focus of an exhibition at the New-York Historical Society, organized by the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens. She's pictured above with her 1938 sculpture Realization. New-York Historical Society hide caption

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New-York Historical Society

Sculptor Augusta Savage Said Her Legacy Was The Work Of Her Students

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Judy Wexler's fifth album, Crowded Heart, is out now. Jeff Fasano/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jeff Fasano/Courtesy of the artist

'Something To Hold': Why This Self-Produced Jazz Singer Made A Physical CD In 2019

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Tintoretto was in his late 20s when he painted this self-portrait circa 1546/48. (Scroll down to compare this portrait to one he painted 40 years later.) The Philadelphia Museum of Art/Art Resource, NY hide caption

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The Philadelphia Museum of Art/Art Resource, NY

Happy 500th, Tintoretto — A Retrospective Honors The Venetian Artist

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Frank Sinatra and Lauren Bacall have a drink at Musso & Frank Grill in 1957. Frank Worth, Courtesy of Capital Art/Getty Images hide caption

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Frank Worth, Courtesy of Capital Art/Getty Images

Celebrities Need Comfort Food Too: A Hollywood Hangout Turns 100

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Rauschenberg worked on The 1/4 Mile on-and-off for 17 years, from 1981 to 1998. The LACMA exhibition was curated by Katia Zavistovski and Michael Govan. Robert Rauschenberg Foundation/Museum Associates/LACMA hide caption

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Robert Rauschenberg Foundation/Museum Associates/LACMA

Wear Comfortable Shoes: This Art Exhibition Covers '1/4 Mile'

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André Previn in London in 1979. Previn died Thursday in Manhattan, at the age of 89. Keystone/Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Keystone/Getty Images

André Previn, Musical Polymath, Has Died At Age 89

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"I probably almost broke down a few times questioning whether or not I was gonna be able to get it done," Pianist Kris Bowers says of learning Don Shirley's music for Green Book. Molly Cranna/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Molly Cranna/Courtesy of the artist

How Pianist Kris Bowers Found His Inner Virtuoso For Oscar-Nominated 'Green Book'

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Titian painted Portrait of a Lady in White around 1561. She's captivated historians and art lovers for centuries — but nobody knows who she is. Elke Estel/Hans-Peter Klut/Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister hide caption

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Elke Estel/Hans-Peter Klut/Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister

Who Was The 'Lady In White'? Titian Painted A Mystery Masterpiece

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Dear Los Angeles features snippets of diary entries and letters written between 1542 to 2018. Above, daybreak over downtown LA in December 2011. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

'Dear Los Angeles' Collects Nearly 5 Centuries Of Opinions About The City

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Carl Reiner, Who Turns 97 Soon, Is Still Working On Projects

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Alice Neel painted this oil on canvas self-portrait in 1980, when she was 75. National Portrait Gallery/Estate of Alice Neel hide caption

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National Portrait Gallery/Estate of Alice Neel

'Eye To I' Exhibition Celebrates Over A Century Of Self-Portraiture

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"I like to accept the way people present themselves," photographer Inge Morath said in a 1987 NPR interview. "You never know what you get. It's fascinating ... that's why I like to do portraits." Morath, pictured above in Paris in 1964, is the subject of a new biography by Linda Gordon called Inge Morath: Magnum Legacy, published by Prestel and Magnum Foundation. Lefevre/AP hide caption

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Lefevre/AP

Biography Captures The Charisma And Confidence Of Photographer Inge Morath

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Mama Stamberg's cranberry relish recipe. Ariel Zambelich & Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich & Emily Bogle/NPR

Cranberry Relish: The NPR Recipe That Divides Thanksgiving Tables

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Mark Bradford says he wanted his Spoiled Foot installation to make the viewer feel "as if the center of the room was no longer available." Joshua White/Courtesy Mark Bradford, Hauser & Wirth hide caption

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Joshua White/Courtesy Mark Bradford, Hauser & Wirth

Memory Fuels Art And Activism In Mark Bradford's 'Tomorrow Is Another Day'

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