Susan Stamberg Nationally renowned broadcast journalist Susan Stamberg is a special correspondent for NPR.
Susan Stamberg at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 21, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Susan Stamberg

Allison Shelley/NPR
Susan Stamberg at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 21, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Susan Stamberg

Special Correspondent

Nationally renowned broadcast journalist Susan Stamberg is a special correspondent for NPR.

Stamberg is the first woman to anchor a national nightly news program, and has won every major award in broadcasting. She has been inducted into the Broadcasting Hall of Fame and the Radio Hall of Fame. An NPR "founding mother," Stamberg has been on staff since the network began in 1971.

Beginning in 1972, Stamberg served as co-host of NPR's award-winning newsmagazine All Things Considered for 14 years. She then hosted Weekend Edition Sunday, and now reports on cultural issues for Morning Edition and Weekend Edition Saturday.

One of the most popular broadcasters in public radio, Stamberg is well known for her conversational style, intelligence, and knack for finding an interesting story. Her interviewing has been called "fresh," "friendly, down-to-earth," and (by novelist E.L. Doctorow) "the closest thing to an enlightened humanist on the radio." Her thousands of interviews include conversations with Laura Bush, Billy Crystal, Rosa Parks, Dave Brubeck, and Luciano Pavarotti.

Prior to joining NPR, she served as producer, program director, and general manager of NPR Member Station WAMU-FM/Washington, DC. Stamberg is the author of two books, and co-editor of a third. Talk: NPR's Susan Stamberg Considers All Things, chronicles her two decades with NPR. Her first book, Every Night at Five: Susan Stamberg's All Things Considered Book, was published in 1982 by Pantheon. Stamberg also co-edited The Wedding Cake in the Middle of the Road, published in 1992 by W. W. Norton. That collection grew out of a series of stories Stamberg commissioned for Weekend Edition Sunday.

In addition to her Hall of Fame inductions, other recognitions include the Armstrong and duPont Awards, the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, The Ohio State University's Golden Anniversary Director's Award, and the Distinguished Broadcaster Award from the American Women in Radio and Television.

A native of New York City, Stamberg earned a bachelor's degree from Barnard College, and has been awarded numerous honorary degrees including a Doctor of Humane Letters from Dartmouth College. She is a Fellow of Silliman College, Yale University, and has served on the boards of the PEN/Faulkner Fiction Award Foundation and the National Arts Journalism Program based at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Stamberg has hosted a number of series on PBS, moderated three Fred Rogers television specials for adults, served as commentator, guest or co-host on various commercial TV programs, and appeared as a narrator in performance with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra and the National Symphony Orchestra. Her voice appeared on Broadway in the Wendy Wasserstein play An American Daughter.

Her late husband Louis Stamberg had his career with the State Department's agency for international development. Her son, Josh Stamberg, an actor, appears in various television series, films, and plays.

Story Archive

In her 1796 cookbook, American Cookery, Amelia Simmons recommends serving turkey or other fowl "with boiled onions and cranberry-sauce, mangoes, pickles or celery." Not long after, (give or take 180+ years), Susan Stamberg began sharing her mother in law's cranberry relish recipe on NPR. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

When turkey met cranberries — a dinner date from the 1700s

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Left, Madame Moitessier, 1856 Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, oil on canvas, The National Gallery, London and right, Woman with a Book, 1932, Pablo Picasso, oil on canvas, The Norton Simon Foundation, Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society(ARS), New York The National Gallery, London / The Norton Simon Foundation, Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society(ARS), New York hide caption

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The National Gallery, London / The Norton Simon Foundation, Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society(ARS), New York

Image from Toiletpaper (December 2012), courtesy of the artists and LACMA Balch Art Research Library. Copyright Toiletpaper magazine (Maurizio Cattelan and Pierpaolo Ferrari) Toiletpaper hide caption

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Toiletpaper
City of McKinney

A Texas town gets its portrait on a silo

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Robert Adams, Pikes Peak, Colorado Springs, 1969 gelatin silver print image: 14 x 14.9 cm (5 1/2 x 5 7/8 in.) Private collection, San Francisco. © Robert Adams, Courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisc hide caption

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© Robert Adams, Courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisc

Lesia Khomenko, Max in the Army, 2022. Oil on canvas, 84.5 x 57.5 inches © Lesia Khomenko hide caption

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© Lesia Khomenko

The Ukrainian women who make art in the face of war

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Encore: Whistler's Mother, meet Whistler's very, very close friend

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New book details the wealth and power of the former richest man in America

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James McNeill Whistler's Symphony in White, No. 1: The White Girl, 1861–1863 National Gallery of Art hide caption

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National Gallery of Art

Whistler's Mother, meet Whistler's very, very close friend at the National Gallery

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J. Paul Getty with his pet lion, Teresa Institutional Archives, Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles hide caption

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Institutional Archives, Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles

A billion here, a billion there: A new book tells the story of J. Paul Getty

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Jack Davis, Watergate Breaks Wide Open. Watercolor and ink on paperboard, 1973. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution © Estate of Jack Davis hide caption

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© Estate of Jack Davis

Bob Woodward recounts the Watergate story in an art museum

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Encore: Denied a stage, she sang for a nation

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Hope Gangloff, Queen Jane Approximately, 2011. Acrylic on canvas, 66 x 108 inches. Collection of Alturas Foundation, San Antonio, Texas © Hope Gangloff. Adam Reich/Courtesy of the Artist and Susan Inglett Gallery, NYC hide caption

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Adam Reich/Courtesy of the Artist and Susan Inglett Gallery, NYC

Pierre-Georges Jeanniot (French, 1848–1934), The Survivors of a Massacre Used as Gravediggers, 1915. Lithograph on wove paper, image: 8 9/16 x 11 7/16 in. sheet: 13 1/4 x 19 1/8 in. Clark Art Institute hide caption

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Clark Art Institute

Visitor experiencing Yayoi Kusama's Infinity Mirrored Room—My Heart Is Dancing into the Universe (2018), part of the 2022 exhibition One with Eternity: Yayoi Kusama in the Hirshhorn Collection at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Matailong Du/Courtesy Ota Fine Arts and Victoria Miro, London/Venice. © YAYOI KUSAMA. hide caption

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Matailong Du/Courtesy Ota Fine Arts and Victoria Miro, London/Venice. © YAYOI KUSAMA.

Dots all, folks—at the Hirshhorn, artist Yayoi Kusama immerses viewers in infinity

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