Laura Sydell Laura Sydell is the Digital Culture Correspondent for the NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and NPR.org.
Laura Sydell
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Laura Sydell

Laura Sydell
NPR/N/A

Laura Sydell

Correspondent, Arts Desk

Laura Sydell fell in love with the intimate storytelling qualities of radio, which combined her passion for theatre and writing with her addiction to news. Over her career she has covered politics, arts, media, religion, and entrepreneurship. Currently Sydell is the Digital Culture Correspondent for NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and NPR.org.

Sydell's work focuses on the ways in which technology is transforming our culture and how we live. For example, she reported on robotic orchestras and independent musicians who find the Internet is a better friend than a record label as well as ways technology is changing human relationships.

Sydell has traveled through India and China to look at the impact of technology on developing nations. In China, she reported how American television programs like Lost broke past China's censors and found a devoted following among the emerging Chinese middle class. She found in India that cell phones are the computer of the masses.

Sydell teamed up with Alex Bloomberg of NPR's Planet Money team and reported on the impact of patent trolls on business and innovations particular to the tech world. The results were a series of pieces that appeared on This American Life and All Things Considered. The hour long program on This American Life "When Patents Attack! - Part 1," was honored with a Gerald Loeb Award and accolades from Investigative Reporters and Editors. A transcript of the entire show was included in The Best Business Writing of 2011 published by Columbia University Press.

Before joining NPR in 2003, Sydell served as a senior technology reporter for American Public Media's Marketplace, where her reporting focused on the human impact of new technologies and the personalities behind the Silicon Valley boom and bust.

Sydell is a proud native of New Jersey and prior to making a pilgrimage to California and taking up yoga she worked as a reporter for NPR Member Station WNYC in New York. Her reporting on race relations, city politics, and arts was honored with numerous awards from organizations such as The Newswomen's Club of New York, The New York Press Club, and The Society of Professional Journalists.

American Women in Radio and Television, The National Federation of Community Broadcasters, and Women in Communications have all honored Sydell for her long-form radio documentary work focused on individuals whose life experiences turned them into activists.

After finishing a one-year fellowship with the National Arts Journalism Program at Columbia University, Sydell came to San Francisco as a teaching fellow at the Graduate School of Journalism at University of California, Berkeley.

Sydell graduated Magna Cum Laude with a bachelor's degree from William Smith College in Geneva, New York, and earned a J.D. from Yeshiva University's Cardozo School of Law.

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Story Archive

A 5G cell (center) in Sacramento, Calif. Mayor Darrell Steinberg says he hopes the new high-speed wireless service will attract businesses to the city. Laura Sydell/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sydell/NPR

Coming To A City Near You, 5G. Fastest Wireless Yet Will Bring New Services

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Hundreds of health care providers around the United States allow their patients to use Apple's Health app to store their medical records. Apple hide caption

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Apple

Storing Health Records On Your Phone: Can Apple Live Up To Its Privacy Values?

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Raman Ghuman demonstrates a HoloLens device at Microsoft's annual conference for software developers on May 7, 2018, in Seattle. Microsoft workers are protesting the use of the augmented reality technology in a U.S. Army contract. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Advocacy groups are asking the Federal Trade Commission to open an investigation into Facebook practices that let children make in-game purchases without their parents' permission. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

The Absher app, available in the Apple and Google apps stores in Saudi Arabia, allows men to track the whereabouts of their wives and daughters. Apple App Store/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Apple App Store/Screenshot by NPR

Earnings Are Up At Google's Parent Company But So Is Spending

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Apple Reports Slow Holiday Sales Hurt Revenue And Profits

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Ravi Belani, managing director at Alchemist Accelerator, speaks at a recent presentation by the startup in Sunnyvale, Calif. Laura Sydell/NPR hide caption

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Tech Industry Confronts A Backlash Against 'Disruptive Innovation'

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Suspended Twitter Account Plays A Role In Misleading Viral Video

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Sarayut Thaneerat/Getty Images/EyeEm

Shutdown Makes Government Websites More Vulnerable To Hackers, Experts Say

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After Years Of Blockbuster Global Sales, Apple's iPhone Hits A Slump

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YouTube star Elle Mills recently took a month off from posting videos, telling her fans, "I will be putting my mental health first for a bit." Courtesy of Elle Mills hide caption

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Courtesy of Elle Mills

The Relentless Pace Of Satisfying Fans Is Burning Out Some YouTube Stars

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