Laura Sydell Laura Sydell is the Digital Culture Correspondent for the NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and NPR.org.
Laura Sydell
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Laura Sydell

Apple CEO Tim Cook Comes Out, Writing He's 'Proud To Be Gay'

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IBM's Watson supercomputer is most famous for winning at Jeopardy! Now it's been called in to come up with recipe ideas. Bob Goldberg/AP/IBM hide caption

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Bob Goldberg/AP/IBM

I've Got The Ingredients. What Should I Cook? Ask IBM's Watson

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A technician opens a vessel containing women's frozen egg cells in April 2011 in Amsterdam. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Silicon Valley Companies Add New Benefit For Women: Egg-Freezing

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Twitter is suing the federal government over First Amendment rights. The tech company says the government stopped it from releasing extra detail about government requests for user information. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Jean Jennings (left) and Frances Bilas set up the ENIAC in 1946. Bilas is arranging the program settings on the Master Programmer. Courtesy of University of Pennsylvania hide caption

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Courtesy of University of Pennsylvania

The Forgotten Female Programmers Who Created Modern Tech

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Amazon recently premiered its new dramedy Transparent. The massive retailer is banking on its original TV content to rope in new customers. Charley Gallay/Getty Images for Amazon Studios hide caption

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Charley Gallay/Getty Images for Amazon Studios

Amazon's Original Content Primes The Pump For Bigger Sales

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Cab Competition In San Francisco Benefits Riders

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Buggy, Bendy iPhones Create Bad Week For Apple

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Minecraft Purchase Gives Microsoft New Foothold

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Yahoo Threatened With Huge Fines If It Didn't Release User Data

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Apple Unveils New Payment System, iPhones, Smartwatch

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The Samsung Galaxy Mega (from left), Samsung Galaxy S4 and Apple iPhone 5 are shown. Apple is expected to announce larger models of its smartphone on Tuesday. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Size Matters: Why Apple Is Expected To Unveil A Bigger iPhone

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos wants to sell all e-books for $9.99, while the publisher Hachette wants to vary the prices. iStockphoto hide caption

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In E-Book Price War, Amazon's Long-Term Strategy Requires Short-Term Risks

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Nude Photos Hack Wasn't Broad Attack On Apple Services

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Amazon Makes A Big Move Into The World Of Online Gaming

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