Laura Sydell Laura Sydell is the Digital Culture Correspondent for the NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and NPR.org.
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Laura Sydell

The Handmaid's Tale, starring Elisabeth Moss, coincided with a spike in new subscribers to Hulu, one of an increasing number of video streaming platforms. George Kraychyk/Hulu hide caption

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George Kraychyk/Hulu

Too Much Video Streaming To Choose From? It's Only Going To Get Worse

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A 5G cell (center) in Sacramento, Calif. Mayor Darrell Steinberg says he hopes the new high-speed wireless service will attract businesses to the city. Laura Sydell/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sydell/NPR

Coming To A City Near You, 5G. Fastest Wireless Yet Will Bring New Services

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Hundreds of health care providers around the United States allow their patients to use Apple's Health app to store their medical records. Apple hide caption

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Apple

Storing Health Records On Your Phone: Can Apple Live Up To Its Privacy Values?

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Raman Ghuman demonstrates a HoloLens device at Microsoft's annual conference for software developers on May 7, 2018, in Seattle. Microsoft workers are protesting the use of the augmented reality technology in a U.S. Army contract. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Advocacy groups are asking the Federal Trade Commission to open an investigation into Facebook practices that let children make in-game purchases without their parents' permission. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

The Absher app, available in the Apple and Google apps stores in Saudi Arabia, allows men to track the whereabouts of their wives and daughters. Apple App Store/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Apple App Store/Screenshot by NPR

Earnings Are Up At Google's Parent Company But So Is Spending

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Apple Reports Slow Holiday Sales Hurt Revenue And Profits

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Ravi Belani, managing director at Alchemist Accelerator, speaks at a recent presentation by the startup in Sunnyvale, Calif. Laura Sydell/NPR hide caption

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Tech Industry Confronts A Backlash Against 'Disruptive Innovation'

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Suspended Twitter Account Plays A Role In Misleading Viral Video

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Sarayut Thaneerat/Getty Images/EyeEm

Shutdown Makes Government Websites More Vulnerable To Hackers, Experts Say

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After Years Of Blockbuster Global Sales, Apple's iPhone Hits A Slump

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YouTube star Elle Mills recently took a month off from posting videos, telling her fans, "I will be putting my mental health first for a bit." Courtesy of Elle Mills hide caption

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Courtesy of Elle Mills

The Relentless Pace Of Satisfying Fans Is Burning Out Some YouTube Stars

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