Laura Sydell Laura Sydell is the Digital Culture Correspondent for the NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and NPR.org.
Laura Sydell
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Laura Sydell

Prince performs at the Grand Palais in Paris on Oct. 11, 2009. Whoever ends up running his estate will face some tough decisions about how to handle his musical legacy. Bertrand Guay/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bertrand Guay/AFP/Getty Images

Beyond Streaming: How Will Future Fans Discover Prince's Music?

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For Sale: One Used Internet Company Called Yahoo

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A hammock-canoe drawing, U.S. Patent No. 299,951, is displayed in a June 1884 publication of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in Alexandria, Va. Critics of the patent system say it's too easy for people to save a slew of semi-realistic ideas, then sue when a firm separately tries to make something similar. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Department Of Justice Says It No Longer Needs Apple's Help To Unlock iPhone

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An attendant wearing an Oculus Rift virtual reality headset demonstrates a glove with a Yamaha Corp. rubber-like sensor at the Wearable Expo in Tokyo, on Jan. 13. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Oculus Rift Launch Makes A Splash. Will It Lead A Wave Of VR Tech?

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Digital Pioneer Andrew Grove Led Intel's Shift From Chips To Microprocessors

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Virtual Reality Vs. Augmented Reality: Should We Believe The Hype?

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Guido Rosa/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Can Computer Programs Be Racist And Sexist?

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Can Computers Be Racist? The Human-Like Bias Of Algorithms

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President Barack Obama speaks at the 2016 SXSW Music, Film + Interactive Festival on March 11, 2016 in Austin, Texas. Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for SXSW hide caption

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Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for SXSW

In Apple Security Case, Obama Calls To Strike A Balance

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The iconic clock tower and library at University of California, Berkeley. The University of California system, especially Berkeley, has a stormy history around free speech and spying by the federal government. John Morgan/Flickr hide caption

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John Morgan/Flickr

At Calif. Campuses, A Test For Free Speech, Privacy And Cybersecurity

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New York police officers stand outside an Apple Store on Tuesday while monitoring a pro-encryption demonstration. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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Julie Jacobson/AP

In Fighting FBI, Apple Says Free Speech Rights Mean No Forced Coding

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Apple's First Amendment Argument

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Privacy is one of a number of issues Apple CEO Tim Cook has called morally important. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Apple's CEO Takes A Stand — And A Risk

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