Laura Sydell Laura Sydell is the Digital Culture Correspondent for the NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and NPR.org.
Laura Sydell
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Laura Sydell

Can Amazon's Fire Tap Into iPad's Success?

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Screengrab of the Facebook Music profile picture. Courtesy of Facebook hide caption

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Courtesy of Facebook

Facebook Announces New Partnerships For Music, Movies And TV

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A shot from the dress rehearsal of Heart of a Soldier, which opens Saturday in San Francisco. Corey Weaver hide caption

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Corey Weaver

'Heart Of A Soldier': An Opera At The Heart Of Sept. 11

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James Stewart carries Kim Novak in the shadow of the Golden Gate Bridge in a scene from Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo. Paramount Pictures/Photofest hide caption

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Paramount Pictures/Photofest

Steve Jobs Resigns, Tim Cook Becomes Apple's CEO

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Jevon Cochran protests in front of a BART train at the Civic Center station in San Francisco on Monday. Jeff Chin/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chin/AP

Netflix boasts that it's the place to go for users to "watch instantly." But licensing fees and deals with other companies prevent it from streaming a good deal of its content online. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

Phone-Only Music Service Takes Tunes On The Go

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Courtesy of EMI Publishing

Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas, Aix-les-Bains, France, circa 1927 Yale Collection of American Literature/Contemporary Jewish Museum hide caption

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Yale Collection of American Literature/Contemporary Jewish Museum

Gertrude Stein Through Artists' Eyes

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On Monday, Apple will be the third big company to introduce a service that will let you access your music from a so-called cloud. Google and Amazon already have music services that make use of the cloud, but there's a difference. Daniel Barry/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Barry/Getty Images